Pacific-Union Club Punch

This is the Pacific-Union Club, at the top of Nob Hill in San Francisco:

Are you going to tell me you can walk by that building and not think, “I want to make their famous punch!”

For a party of ten. Into a large punch-bowl place ten tablespoonfuls of bar sugar and ten tablespoonfuls of freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice. Add two jiggers of Curaçao and dissolve the whole in about a quart of effervescent water. Add two quarts of champagne and one bottle of good cognac. Stir thoroughly, ice, decorate and serve in thin glassware.

READER: be sure to use regular, orange Curacao, not blue curacao, or your punch will be a revolting green color.

That recipe is from William “Cocktail” Boothby’s 1908 book, The World’s Cocktails and How To Make Them.  Let’s take a look at Boothby’s resume, just to make sure he’s for real:

  • Minstrel performer.
  • Bartender in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and Kansas City.
  • Bartender at Byron Hot Springs.
  • Bartender (or in his terms “presiding deity”) at Hotel Rafael, San Rafael, California, in “the gay days when Baron von Schroeder was making history over there”.
  • Bartender at the Silver Palace, San Francisco
  • Bartender at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco.
  • Saloon owner.
  • Assemblyman in California in 1895. The 1908 edition of The World’s Drinks & How To Mix Them begins “To the liquor dealers of San Francisco who unanimously assisted in my election to the Legislature by an unprecedented majority.”
  • Soda drink counter supervisor, Olympic Club, during Prohibition
(from wikipedia)


One Comment on “Pacific-Union Club Punch”

  1. I am curious to find out what blog system you are utilizing?
    I’m having some minor security problems with my latest site and I’d like to
    find something more secure. Do you have any recommendations?


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s