The future: primitive?

Down in Manhattan Beach on a small mission, I stopped into Brothers Burritos, recommended as a Beach Cities lunch spot by Travis of El Segundo / Hood River.  “You get two mini burritos.”  Sold.

At Brothers, the Pacific just a few streets down, they have a rack of old issues of surfing mags, including Surfer’s Journal.  This magazine has gripped me before, it’s really impressive, almost as much a journal of travel and philosophy as it is of waves.

In this issue was a piece by Jamie Brisick where he walks a stretch of Hawaii’s North Shore, “from Velzyland to Log Cabins,” a stretch he’s visited and lived in, on and off, for something like thirty-five years.  He remembers legends, has encounters, studies the changes to the beach, shares memories.

This struck me:

Blacksmiths.  Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia began as a blacksmith.  How about Primitive Technologies guy?

Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.

Also It should be noted that I don’t live in the wild but just practice this as a hobby. I live in a modern house and eat modern food. I just like to see how people in ancient times built and made things. It is a good hobby that keeps you fit and doesn’t cost anything apart from time and effort.

from his website.

Out in the Mojave there are pockets of people into permaculture, imagining perhaps that the future may be primitive.

I’m not sure how primitive the future will be.  Some skills and trades are ancient and seem to endure.  The future may not be as futuristic as we once, collectively, seemed to dream.  Maybe the primitive sense is just an adjustment of expectation.  Does technology have to move forward all the time?  The primitive future.  Could there be a world where the past seems futuristic?  The language of backwards and forwards almost suggests a direction History moves.  But History also tells of times when life became more primitive, even for centuries.  How dark were the Dark Ages is a good debate, too big for this space.  Leave that out and there are still times where civilizations dissolve or collapse or just kinda retreat or fade out.

No matter how primitive the future gets, there’s something soothing about practicing ancient arts and crafts and trades.  Simple, without being primitive — could that be a future to hope for?

Very satisfying burritos.  I’ve since been to the Brothers in Hermosa Beach, which I also liked but just not quite as much.

The Manhattan Beach Public Library has got to be, real estate wise, one of the best public libraries in the nation.  You can sit in a nice chair and stare at the ocean.

 


many things on the internet

remind me of this one:

from:


this scene from Newsradio

(for when YouTube removes the link, it is a scene where Matthew and Joe bet on whether the next song on the radio will be good or not.  The song that comes up is “Wichita Lineman.”)

Some things I like about the scene: the idea that depending on the circumstances you could believe this was a good or bad song.  Matthew trying to sell it.  Also Matthew’s honesty.

This may have been the first time I heard this song?


Scrapbasket

Some scrap items found on my phone:

1)

I had to stop following Caroline Calloway on Instagram which is too bad, there’s a genius to sentences like this.

2) A view in Pittsburgh:

Pittsburgh is beautiful.

3) Rocks

4) I believe the source here is an interview with Years & Years singer Olly Alexander in Issue 11 of The Happy Reader, but can’t confirm, no longer have the issue.  The phrase “Who is the hot boy?  Who is the boy that will always bring the looks?” does not appear exactly in a Google search.

5) Seen in Hollywood:

6) Cat on a tray:

7) Portrait of the blogger as a boy:

 


Is it a crime if no one stops you?

The worst crimes were dared by a few, willed by more and tolerated by all,

is a quote I’ve heard and seen attributed to Tacitus.  I couldn’t find it in The Histories, just did a search.  Maybe I missed it somehow, it might be in there.  I did find a postcard from my sister.

You gotta be careful, a lot of these “classic quotes” were conjured up somewhere and never really checked, or in context they mean the opposite.

Set down to write here after becoming agitated and worked up watching Senator Ron Johnson two weeks ago on “Meet The Press.”  Witness the sputtering nonsense.

 

 


Joshua Tree National Park has exploded in popularity: why?

This chart was an attempt to test my thesis, that Instagram played a role in the dramatic rise in visits to Joshua Tree National Park.

I also incorporated a challenge to my thesis, offered by a colleague who suggested the answer might have something to do with the popular Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.  Drivers to that festival from Los Angeles would have to pass signs for Joshua Tree NP and experience the intoxicating desert landscape.

What about the AirBNB factor?:

Was stunned to be reminded about how recently Instagram (2010) and AirBNB (2007) were founded.  These companies changed the world very, very fast.  We still haven’t had time to contemplate what these changes mean, both to communities and to human brains.

How does a fragile patch of desert ecosystem handle two million extra human visitors a year?  You might think they’d increase the park’s budget.  It appears the opposite is happening?

(Any time I look into a fact like this, so much appreciation for our nation’s journalists, looking into the files, tracking it all down.)

There’s rarely a single cause for things, but I feel confident in saying Instagram, or maybe more broadly, the instant sharing of powerful photographs on phones, played a role in the dramatic rise in popularity of Joshua Tree national park.

What might be other factors?  Commercial photography and car commercial stuff may have boomed out in Joshua Tree and joshua tree-populated areas.  I don’t know how you’d measure that data, but I feel it.

Credit to the wonderful movie Ingrid Goes West here, a movie about Joshua Tree and Instagram and California fantasy in general, which makes the same connection between the desert landscape and Instagram.

My studies suggest no burst in popularity connected to the U2 album “The Joshua Tree.”

Source data on visitors.

 

 

 


Statues of Beverly Hills

walked through the restored park area – “Beverly Gardens Park” – along Santa Monica Boulevard as it enters Beverly Hills.

This statue is called The Hunter and Hounds, by A. Jacourmat.  The plaque tells me “This shell-torn statue stood guard above a subterranean chamber in which Signal Corps. 3rd Division American Army maintained headquarters communications during bombardment of Chateau Thierry Second Battle of the Marne.”  Wow.

More info at publicartinla.com

Pond.

a true “lucky duck.”  Here’s another look at this guy: