Waterless Places

from:


Dorothea Lange

Three of the four Arnold children. The oldest boy earned the money to buy his bicycle. Western Washington, Thurston County, Michigan Hill.

Let’s look

Child living in Oklahoma City shack town

at a sample

Cotton picker, southern San Joaquin Valley

of the

Woman in pea picker’s camp. California. “I seen our corn dry up and blow over the fence back there in Oklahoma”

8073 or so 

Children of migratory Mexican field workers. The older one helps tie carrots in the field. Coachella Valley, California

Dorothea Lange photos

Pregnant migrant woman living in California squatter camp. Kern County

Japanese mother and daughter, agricultural workers near Guadalupe, California

At the Library of Congress

Mexican girl who picks peas for the eastern market. Imperial Valley, California

In a carrot pullers’ camp near Holtville, Imperial Valley, California. Woman from Broken Row, Oklahoma

Farm Security Administration (FSA) camp for migratory agricultural workers. Meeting of the camp council. Farmersville, California

Children of migratory workers, hauling water, American River camp, San Joaquin Valley, California

Mexican quarter of Los Angeles, California. Average rental is eight dollars. Some houses have plumbing. See card 1799-C for detailed information


WARNING TO MASSACHUSETTS DRIVERS!

Discovered a serious error in my DeLorme Atlas & Gazetteer

You can’t actually drive from Moon Island to Long Island!  There’s a road on the map that’s just not there!

Be careful out there guys and ALWAYS double check visual clues before attempting to drive from one island to another.


Trouble at the Allah-Las concert !

In Rotterdam, a concert cancelled after Spanish police warn Dutch police about a possible bomb plot.

a terror plot foiled?

I wonder what the terrorists don’t like about this band.

The name?

Colin Drury of The Guardian, Aug. 2016, reports:

They chose to use Allah – Arabic for god – because they wanted something “holy sounding”. But they say they never realised some might interpret it as trivialising or mocking their religious beliefs. “We get emails from Muslims, here in the US and around the world, saying they’re offended, but that absolutely wasn’t our intention,” says Michaud. “We email back and explain why we chose the name and mainly they understand.”

In Turkey, a show got pulled because the promoter didn’t feel comfortable. “But what’s the alternative?” asks Siadatian. “We’ve had the name so long I don’t think we can change it. That wouldn’t work. We don’t dwell. You know, no regrets.”

What the band do regret is the growing gentrification of hometown LA.

I guess if I stand for anything it’s for a band’s right to call themselves whatever, without anybody getting blowed up over it.

Free speech protections do not equal endorsements. But in the civilized world you can call your band whatever you want.

Don’t know much about the band. I like this song Catamaran. Very cool song.

Cube Houses of Rotterdam by wiki user Hanselpedia

Hey thanks for the birthday wishes Helytimes readers!  We aim to share with you quality, interesting, well-sourced content about California, the USA, and the world, and we appreciate you.  


McCain

Happened to be reading this this weekend.

Michener says:

 

The ugly old aviator:

Dropped dead four days after the Japanese surrender.


What can we learn from Lee?

source, wiki photo by Cville Dog

Lots of conversations about history, how we should remember our history, etc.  Amateur historians love arguing about Lee, how can you not, he is interesting.

Robert E. Lee had many noble personal qualities, as did many officers in Hitler’s army.

If there’s anything to learn from him, might it not be that a man of principle and dignity can end up on the outrageously wrong side of the most important moral issue of his time?

Nobody should judge John Kelly without reading this Washington Post profile of him by Greg Jaffe.

About 12 hours later, the elder Kelly e-mailed his extended family in Boston, preparing them for the possibility that Robert might be maimed or killed. Kelly knew that Robert went out on almost every patrol with his men through mine-filled fields. One of the Marines at Bethesda told him that Robert was “living on luck.”

“I write you all to just let you know he’s in the thick of it and to keep him in your thoughts,” Kelly typed. “We are doing a Novena a minute down here and there is no end in sight.”

On Oct. 31, Kelly sent a second e-mail to his eldest sister, the family matriarch. “I am sweating bullets,” he confided. “Pray. Pray. Pray. He’s such a good boy . . . and Marine.”

This is painful to watch:

What a dilemma: the American people have elected a mean angry fool, do I try and do what I can to contain him or resign knowing he might do more damage without me around?

What’s the point of a statue of Lee if not to learn from him?

From this take on Lee by Roy Blount Jr. in Smithsonian mag:

We may think we know Lee because we have a mental image: gray. Not only the uniform, the mythic horse, the hair and beard, but the resignation with which he accepted dreary burdens that offered “neither pleasure nor advantage”: in particular, the Confederacy, a cause of which he took a dim view until he went to war for it. He did not see right and wrong in tones of gray, and yet his moralizing could generate a fog, as in a letter from the front to his invalid wife: “You must endeavour to enjoy the pleasure of doing good. That is all that makes life valuable.” All right. But then he adds: “When I measure my own by that standard I am filled with confusion and despair.”


Let him deny himself

Went looking for the source of a story that Robert E. Lee, asked by a mom for advice on raising her boy, said “teach him to deny himself.”

From Douglas Southall Freeman’s four volume 1934 R. E. Lee: A Biography.  The source cited is one Joseph Packard’s Recollections of a Long Life.

Original source probably one JC:

And he said to them all, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.

Luke 9:23, KJV.