Anybody remember this one?

it’s possible attempts were made to record this song onto an audio cassette.


Sure

Thought this was fun.  via Jia Tolentino’s twitter!


Classical KUSC / soundless WW2 footage

found that playing Smithsonian Channel’s The Pacific War In Color while KUSC our local classical station was coming out of my old radio created a cool effect.


Woody Guthrie’s birthday

 

“Woody Guthrie’s childhood home as is appeared in 1979,” from Wikipedia:

source. Walter Smellings, Historic American Buildings Survey.

Man, you go to read Woody Guthrie’s wikipedia page, and next thing you know you’re looking at a photo of a 1911 lynching (warning: upsetting but are we obliged as citizens to look?)

Even the story of the photo of the lynching is haunting:

James Allen, an Atlanta antiques collector, spent years looking for postcards of lynchings for his Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America (2000). “Hundreds of flea markets later,” he wrote, “a trader pulled me aside and in conspiratorial tones offered to sell me a real photo postcard. It was Laura Nelson hanging from a bridge, caught so pitiful and tattered and beyond retrieving—like a paper kite sagged on a utility wire.”

The book accompanied an exhibition of 60 lynching postcards from 1880 to 1960, Witness: Photographs of Lynchings from the Collection of James Allen, which opened at the Roth Horowitz Gallery in New York in January 2000. Allen argued that lynching photographers were more than passive spectators. They positioned and lit the corpses as if they were game birds, he wrote, and the postcards became an important part of the act, emphasizing its political nature.

Allen’s publication of the images encountered a mixed reception. Julia Hotton, a black museum curator in New York, said that, with older blacks especially: “If they hear a white man with a Southern accent is collecting these photos, they get a little skittish.”

All kinds of wild questions considered in this 2000 LA Times / J. R. Moehringer profile of Allen:

The man’s story enhances the beauty of the shack, Allen believes, and its value. The man’s story makes the shack more than a work of folk art; it’s a sort of monument. When Allen sells the shack, along with some furniture and art done by the old man, the asking price will be just under $100,000.

How about Bryan Stevenson’s project?

How did I get here again?

Oh right.

Learning about Woody Guthrie.

 

 


The valkyrie of the piano

was listening to KUSC the other day, and they said Venezuelan Teresa Carreño’s nickname was “the valkyrie of the piano.”  What a nickname.  Some of her compositions:

 


Carter Families

 


Sir Garfield Sobers, by Mighty Sparrow

Two cool names.  From the 1966 album This Is Sparrow.

Context: