Rubber bullet and non-lethal projectile collecting

Sunday morning four weeks ago on the streets of the Beverly – Fairfax district was a bonanza for us collectors of non-lethal shells and projectiles.

The Honus Wagner card of this kind of collection is the LAPD stamped bean bag shell

A key guide for the hobbyist is the LAPD’s equipment page.

I hope I don’t have any more opportunities to add to my collection.

(Always remember the scene in The Last Castle (2001) where James Gandolfini, a military history buff, hears Redford, a real veteran, assess his collection of Civil War bullets and Minié balls: “it’s just something that caused some poor bastard a whole lotta pain.” 

Couple real good scenes in that movie.  When Redford teaches Ruffalo the meaning of a salute!)

 

 

 


Pools and regulations

At swimming pools at hotels and apartment complexes here in California you’ll see this sign.  Sometimes it causes quite a stir from people who’ve never seen it before, as it does summon up some graphic imagery, and violates the traditional taboo on not printing the word “diarrhea” on large public signs.

I’ve been pondering this sign for years.  It’s not a choice to put it up.  The uniform wording and ubiquity suggests there must be a rule.  So that means there must’ve been some kind of meeting at a regulatory agency or the legislature where they discussed the diarrhea danger, and agreed to the diarrhea sign rule.  Sometimes I’ve idly wondered if the sign were some kind of prank on pool owners, to force them to make all lucky pool users ponder the word “diarrhea”  Did a bureaucrat harboring long-felt resentment against pool enjoyers push this through?  Punishment for exclusion from a pool party, years ago?

Well, finally I decided to look into it, and quickly found the answer, in this Conejo Valley Guide post, “What’s The Deal With All of Those  Signs Posted At The Swimming Pool.”

The requirement for this and other community pool signs comes from California Building Code Chapter 31B “Public Pools,” Section 3120B “Required Signs.”

Section 3120B.11 “Diarrhea” indicates the sign must have letters at least 1 inch high, clearly states what is noted above, and is posted at the entrance area of a public pool. Public pools include municipal/park district pools, hotel pools, water parks, swim schools, homeowner shared pools, apartment pools, campground pools, etc. One is thus not required to post this sign at your home pool (unless you really want to).

As the post notes, there have been outbreaks of waterborne disease from pools.

I’m inclined to give some benefit to common sense in the case of pool diarrhea.  I think the California Building Code may have gone too far, living up to California’s reputation as a bit of a ninny when it comes to regulations.  From a brief review, it seems like localities could make local amendments to the building code, and make themselves diarrhea-sign free zones.  I would support that in my neighborhood.  But it’s work to do that, and we can agree it’s not the most pressing problem.

What about the 14 days part?  Must our language always be so bureaucratic?  Do we just need a simpler sign that says: Be Cool About The Pool?  Should the sign also be in Spanish?

Do we have a case study here in how rules, once made, tend to stay just through inertia?  Is this a case of an annoying nanny state, or a reasonable public health measure?  I suppose if it gives an occasional chuckle and a helpful reminder, it’s not so bad.  Just a bit of local color.

 

 


Earthquake?

 

or something more?  Let’s get a more detailed atlas…

Lotta shakin’ and quakin’ going on at Naval Weapons Center China Lake (Restricted Area).

I’m prepared to conclude this was no earthquake, but the escape or an attempted escape of a captured UFO.

Interesting thing about this area: though desolate it’s dotted with petroglyphs, some alleged to be 10,000 years old.


Chukar

The chukar partridge is the national bird of Pakistan and Iraq.

Kasiarunachalam for Wikipedia

A taxidermied specimen in the Auckland museum.

There’s also a population in the United States.

MinoZig for Wikipedia

The chukar population extends to eastern California.

Originally native to southern Eurasia, the chukar (also known as partridge) was brought from Pakistan in 1932 to be a game bird. It is now plentiful in northeastern California (east of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Range) and the Mojave Desert. It can be found below sea level in Death Valley, and as high as 12,000 feet in elevation in the White Mountains. A chukar range map is available on the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) website.

source: CDFW News. More:

Their call is a distinctive chuck-chuck-chuck, from which their name is derived. Skilled hunters who can replicate the call will find this tactic useful.

Gotta get into the desert uplands and try to find one of these guys.

 

 


Forest roads

If anyone needs to borrow this one you can.  Picked up in San Luis Obispo.


Mohave / Mojave people

 

source. Photographer is CC Pierce.

Two Mojave Indian women playing a game (fortune-telling with bones?), ca.1900:

More, by Molhansen, 1856:

Timothy O’Sullivan photographed these guys:

Panambona and Mitiwara are these guys names, apparently

 


Distant view of the lost city of Qattara

The inhabitants known for their bloodthirstiness would’ve killed me if I approached any further than the Unholy Gate.


Santa Anita, you had one job!

Santa Anita racetrack is a beautiful place.  There’s history. Seabiscuit raced there, a statue honors him.  It’s good to sit in the stands, look at the mountains, and drink a beer, watch the horses race.  Read the little horse newspaper.

Santa Anita’s been having problems though.  Horses keep dying there.

Since December 36 (!) horses have died.

On Saturday at Santa Anita they had the Breeders’ Cup, a nationally televised race.

Santa Anita!  This is your big moment.  All eyes on you.  You’re on TV, time to shine.

Please.

Don’t let any horses die.

They had ONE job.  And what happened?

A green screen was rushed onto the track to block Mongolian Groom from the view of 67,811 fans and a prime-time television audience. He was loaded onto an equine ambulance and taken to a hospital on the backstretch.

Cup officials said in a statement about two hours after the race that Mongolian Groom had been euthanized after suffering a serious fracture to his left hind leg.

Guys!

Couldn’t we pretend we were giving him tender care? euthanize him later?!

I’ll be sad if Santa Anita closes down.  It’s like some enchanted time capsule of southern California.  But, if you’re in the horse business, you can’t get me excited about horses and then keep killing them.

Start of the Juvenile Sprint by Jlvsclrk for Wiki

 


Around LA

Just a small street scene.  I like when cities look like themselves.

Disney + has paid (I guess) to put these signs over all the bus stations in West Hollywood.  Now it looks like shitty Disneyland.  This is a bad brand move for Disney, in my opinion.  When you see a Disney sign, that should mean you’re somewhere wonderful and fun like Disneyland, not West Hollywood.  West Hollywood and Disney aren’t a good brand fit.  Maybe Pasadena?


Santa Ana Winds

If you’re a reader of Helytimes you’ve probably come across these quotes about the dry, spooky winds that originate in the desert and blow into Los Angeles.

The definition of these winds in common use gets kind of loose.  Any wind that’s blowing not the cooling, perfume air of the Pacifc, but the dry, harsh air off the desert, can get counted as a Santa Ana wind.

One of the oldest references to the Santa Ana winds appears to be in a January, 1943 issue of California Folklore Quarterly.  Luckily we have that issue handy, and present it here for any interested California scholars.

Maybe next week we’ll look into The Vanishing Hitchhiker


Will the future be primitive?

Down in Manhattan Beach on a small mission, I stopped into Brothers Burritos, recommended as a Beach Cities lunch spot by Travis of El Segundo / Hood River.  “You get two mini burritos.”  Sold.

At Brothers, the Pacific just a few streets down, they have a rack of old issues of surfing mags, including Surfer’s Journal.  This magazine has gripped me before, it’s really impressive, almost as much a journal of travel and philosophy as it is of waves.

In this issue was a piece by Jamie Brisick where he walks a stretch of Hawaii’s North Shore, “from Velzyland to Log Cabins,” a stretch he’s visited and lived in, on and off, for something like thirty-five years.  He remembers legends, has encounters, studies the changes to the beach, shares memories.

This struck me:

Blacksmiths.  Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia began as a blacksmith.  How about Primitive Technologies guy?

Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.

Also It should be noted that I don’t live in the wild but just practice this as a hobby. I live in a modern house and eat modern food. I just like to see how people in ancient times built and made things. It is a good hobby that keeps you fit and doesn’t cost anything apart from time and effort.

from his website.

Out in the Mojave there are pockets of people into permaculture, imagining perhaps that the future may be primitive.

I’m not sure how primitive the future will be.  Some skills and trades are ancient and seem to endure.  The future may not be as futuristic as we once, collectively, seemed to dream.  Maybe the primitive sense is just an adjustment of expectation.  Does technology have to move forward all the time?  The primitive future.  Could there be a world where the past seems futuristic?  The language of backwards and forwards almost suggests a direction History moves.  But History also tells of times when life became more primitive, even for centuries.  How dark were the Dark Ages is a good debate, too big for this space.  Leave that out and there are still times where civilizations dissolve or collapse or just kinda retreat or fade out.

No matter how primitive the future gets, there’s something soothing about practicing ancient arts and crafts and trades.  Simple, without being primitive — could that be a future to hope for?

Very satisfying burritos.  I’ve since been to the Brothers in Hermosa Beach, which I also liked but just not quite as much.

The Manhattan Beach Public Library has got to be, real estate wise, one of the best public libraries in the nation.  You can sit in a nice chair and stare at the ocean.

 


Statues of Beverly Hills

walked through the restored park area – “Beverly Gardens Park” – along Santa Monica Boulevard as it enters Beverly Hills.

This statue is called The Hunter and Hounds, by A. Jacourmat.  The plaque tells me “This shell-torn statue stood guard above a subterranean chamber in which Signal Corps. 3rd Division American Army maintained headquarters communications during bombardment of Chateau Thierry Second Battle of the Marne.”  Wow.

More info at publicartinla.com

Pond.

a true “lucky duck.”  Here’s another look at this guy:


They turned the cat cafe into a guinea pig cafe as part of the Emmys campaign for Fleabag


A visit to the San Diego Museum of Art

“What’re they gonna have at the San Diego Museum of Art?” I said, sneering.  “A statue of a fish taco?  An exhibit of craft IPA labels? A fluorescent Jeep Wrangler? A Tony Gwynn jersey?*”

This had been my scoffer’s attitude.  But on the website of SDMA I learnt that they have a painting by Hieronymous Bosch, The Arrest of Christ.

Seeing a close to 500 year old painting by a weirdo master seemed worth a short Uber.

I was really impressed with SDMA!  Small, but packed with wonders.  Something good everywhere.  There was an exhibit of “Golden Age of Spain” art that I didn’t even bother with.  (Usually I find I like the art that came right before the golden age?)

The wall placard attributes Christ Arrested to the Workshop of Hieronymous Bosch, not Bosch himself.  And how about Madonna of the Roses, by Pseudo-Pier Francesco Fiorentino?

Or Portrait of a Man by an unknown Flemish artist (once attributed to Hans Memling):

Goya, You Who Cannot.  (They must have a bunch more Goyas in storage).

11th century Sambander.

George Inness, Farm Landscape, Cattle in Pasture—Sunset, Nantucket

Thomas Hart Benton, After Many Days.

An untitled work by George Copeland Ault.

Giotto, God The Father with Angels.

Sunday Afternoon, Hughie Lee Smith.

In The Patio by Georgia O’Keefe.

Anyway.  This was all a nice break from Comic-Con.

At Comic-Con I heard that the X-Men are coming back.

* cheers to Jeff K. for this last punchline.

 

 


is this a good photo?

was trying to capture the stark steepness of the street across the lake, and the special but unrelenting quality of afternoon sun in LA, and also how LA can look very lush and inviting while also having a kind of washed down, contained, prison-like aspect.

Thought this Vox piece about Antelope Canyon by Rebecca Jacobs was insightful on the meanings of photography in Instagram Age.

What’s the meaning of a tour where they tell you how to photograph it?

 first see the rocks early the next morning with a tour group, which is the only way you are allowed to visit them. Before our guide tells us his name, which we find out is Anthony, he asks us the most crucial question of the day: “Do you all have iPhones?”

Anthony instructs all of us except the kid with the Samsung to open our camera apps, click the icon in the top right corner, and swipe to a setting called “Vivid Warm.”

DeLillo times!


Showbiz

a non-industry friend asked me to summarize the current dispute between the WGA and the ATA.  I did my best:

Anyway.  We welcome comment!


How far could you get from LA using public transportation networks?

For the purposes of this exercise, let’s rule out Amtrak.  It’s “public transportation” in a way but that’s another level.  Let’s talk about traveling, by public transit only, no Greyhound, connecting network to network, and see how far you could get.

Worked on this problem briefly and here’s what I came up with.

The key is really Lancaster.  From LA you could take an 785 Antelope Valley Transit Authority Bus to Lancaster.

From Lancaster, you could connect on Kern Valley Transit and go as far as Lost Hills or Delano, or even out to Ridgecrest.

You’ll be dropped off around here:

But, you could also hop on the Eastern Sierra Transit Authority’s Mammoth Express, go out to Lone Pine, change there for a bus that will take you to Reno, Nevada.

You could even hop off early, in Carson City, Nevada.  It’s thus easier to travel in this method to Nevada’s state capitol than it is to California’s.

Far as I can tell, closest you can get to Sacramento without resorting to Amtrak or Greyhound from Los Angeles is Delano or Lost Hills.

Along the coast I don’t see how you get farther than Santa Barbara.

If you’re heading east, I could see you getting to Hemet with some help from the Riverside Transit Authority, or you could work your way all the way to the east side of the Salton Sea with some help from the Sunline Transit Agency.

We welcome corrections from our transit-minded readers!


Four Views of Yosemite

Yosemite has to be one of the most photographed places in the world.  Yet, everyone there is: producing more photos.  You walk around and see everyone with their phones out, snapping away.  Or people not satisfied with phones, hauling big cameras too.

What is the meaning of continuing to photograph it?  Maybe there’s an appeal like what draws rock climbers there, you want to try your stuff on the famous playground of the masters.

My mind was opened reading this Playboy interview with Ansel Adams, where he talks about trying to make the photograph capture what he was feeling:

Similarly, while the landscapes that I have photographed in Yosemite are recognized by most people and, of course, the subject is an important part of the pictures, they are not “realistic.” Instead, they are an imprint of my visualization. All of my pictures are optically very accurate–I use pretty good lenses–but they are quite unrealistic in terms of values. A more realistic simple snapshot captures the image but misses everything else. I want a picture to reflect not only the forms but what I had seen and felt at the moment of exposure.

More:

Playboy: When did you know you could accomplish it?
Adams: I had my first visualization while photographing Half Dome in Yosemite in 1927. It was a remarkable experience. After a long day with my camera, I had only two photographic plates left. I found myself staring at Half Dome, facing the monolith, seeing and feeling things that only the photograph itself can tell you. I took the first exposure and, somehow, I knew it was inadequate. It did not capture what I was feeling. It was not going to reflect the tremendous experience. Then, to use Stieglitz’ expression, I saw in my mind’s eye what the picture should look like and I realized how I must get it. I put on a red filter and figured out the exposure correctly, and I succeeded! When I made the prints, it proved my concept was correct. The first exposure came out just all right. It was a good photograph, but it in no way had the spirit and excitement I had felt. The second was Monolith, the Face of Half Dome, which speaks for itself.


Jobs

from:

Kondo’ing some books.  Picking up Walter Isaacson’s bio of Steve Jobs does not spark joy, but I did take another look at several passages I’d noted.

Here’re some previous Helytimes posts related to Steve Jobs.


Paul Beatty’s Literature From Los Angeles Class

OV: You teach an MFA class at Columbia called Literature from Los Angeles. Why didyou decide to do that?

PB: Why? I guess my reason is twofold. I stole the idea from a friend of mine who actually taught a class like that. She’s always complaining, “These kids never have any setting!” So I wanted to talk about setting and what setting means, not just in terms of place but what the notions of setting are. So it’s partly that. And partly a way of getting the students to read stuff they haven’t read before. So we read Chester Himes, we read Michael Jaime-Becerra; we read Wanda Coleman, we read Karen Tei Yamashita; we readBret Easton Ellis, we read Bukowski. We read a ton of stuff.

I’d like to take the class Paul Beatty lays out in this LitHub interview.  Sent me to learn about Chester Himes.

Mike Davis in City of Quartz: Excavating the Future of Los Angeles, describing the prevalence of racism in Hollywood in the 1940s and ’50s, cites Himes’ brief career as a screenwriter for Warner Brothers, terminated when Jack L. Warner heard about him and said: “I don’t want no niggers on this lot.”[4] Himes later wrote in his autobiography:

Up to the age of thirty-one I had been hurt emotionally, spiritually and physically as much as thirty-one years can bear. I had lived in the South, I had fallen down an elevator shaft, I had been kicked out of college, I had served seven and one half years in prison, I had survived the humiliating last five years of Depression in Cleveland; and still I was entire, complete, functional; my mind was sharp, my reflexes were good, and I was not bitter. But under the mental corrosion of race prejudice in Los Angeles I became bitter and saturated with hate.