Let us raise a standard to which the wise and the honest can repair

Matthew G. Bisanz for Wikipedia

Always moved by George Washington’s words on the Washington Square Arch.

Try not to think about the 20,000 anonymous people buried in what’s now Washington Square Park — history is complicated!

 

 


Warren Buffetts, real and fake

These dudes started a fake Warren Buffett account on a bet, and within a few days it was retweeted by Peggy Noonan, Kanye, etc.

Impressed with how generic and bland the advice was.

The worship of Buffett as an oracle is not just a US phenomenon.  If anything it may be stronger in Asia.  In Korea in 2007, I saw subway vending machines selling biographies of Warren Buffett.  In this video, being interviewed by a Chinese magazine, you can see Warren Buffett’s partner, Charlie Munger, attempt to explain why he thinks he and Buffett are so popular in China.  He suggests that it’s because much of their advice is very Confucian:

Actual Warren Buffett’s advice is free and very available.  You can read all of Berkshire Hathaway’s letters to shareholders, which are funny and interesting at times (the better you are at skimming the boring parts, the more enjoyment you will get out of them).  You can see everything he invests in — he legally has to tell you!

Investing is simple, but not easy

is a quote often attributed to Buffett, though I myself cannot find the original source for it.

Buffett himself was asked about the fake account on CNBC:

QUICK: BUT THERE WAS A FAKE TWITTER ACCOUNT, A FAKE WARREN BUFFETT TWITTER ACCOUNT THAT WENT FROM 20,000 FOLLOWERS TO 200,000 FOLLOWERS IN 24 HOURS BY TWEETING OUT ALL KINDS OF PITHY SORT OF SOUND ADVICE, THINGS THAT FOLKSY SAYINGS THAT SOUNDED LIKE IT COULD HAVE COME FROM YOU. WHY DON’T YOU TWEET MORE OFTEN?

BUFFETT: WELL I JUST DON’T SEE A REASON TO. I PUT OUT AN ANNUAL REPORT, AND I DO NOT HAVE A DAILY VIEW ON ALL KINDS OF THINGS. AND, AND MAYBE I’VE GOT A GUY IN THIS COPYCAT OR IMITATOR, MAYBE HE’S PUTTING OUT BETTER STUFF THAN I WOULD. SO IF HE PUTS OUT GOOD ADVICE, I’LL TAKE CREDIT FOR IT.

QUICK: WE HAVE SEEN SOME CEOs WHO LIKE TO TWEET VERY FREQUENTLY, INCLUDING ELON MUSK.

BUFFETT: YES.

QUICK: HE’S CERTAINLY SOMEBODY WHO TWEETED A LOT. WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT PEOPLE WHO TWEET A LOT?

BUFFETT: I DON’T THINK IT’S HELPED HIM A LOT. NO, I THINK IT’S — WELL, IT’D BE PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS TO START COMMENTING ON BERKSHIRE DAILY, WHICH I NEVER WOULD DO. I WON’T DO IT WITH YOU. BUT I THINK THERE’S OTHER THINGS IN LIFE I WANT TO DO THAN TWEET. I MEAN, I’M NOT THAT DESPERATE FOR SOMEBODY TO HEAR MY OPINION ON THIS.

This aspect of Buffett is much celebrated:

It’s sometimes forgotten or overlooked that he also owns a $7.9 million house in Laguna Beach.

Though in fairness he bought it in 1971 for $150,000.


Particular grace at the Constitutional Convention

Picture it: Philadelphia, Friday, May 25, 1787.

The convention is getting started.  First job is to choose a president.  Mr. Robert Morris of Pennsylvania nominates George Washington of Virginia.

Mr Jn RUTLIDGE seconded the motion; expressing his confidence that the choice would be unanimous, and observing that the presence of Genl Washington forbade any observations on the occasion which might be otherwise be proper.

General Washington was accordingly unanimously elected by ballot, and conducted to the chair by Mr R. Morris and Mr. Rutlidge; from which in a very emphatic manner he thanked the Convention for the honor they had conferred on him, reminded them of the novelty of the scene of business in which he was to act, lamented his want of better qualifications, and claimed the indulgence of the House towards the involuntary errors which his inexperience might occasion.

That’s George Washington, the guy who had just defeated the British Empire, who held the Continental Army together over seven horrible years on the strength of his own character.  He begins this job with an expression of humility. An apology for any involuntary errors.

Then Madison adds, in a parenthetical:

Particular grace.

Happy Fourth of July everybody!


This guy Jordan Peterson

The first piece of advice in his book

is

stand up straight with your shoulders back, as a lobster does.

(paraphrase)

That’s as far as I think I will get in the book, partly because I seem to have misplaced my copy.

Stand up straight with your shoulders back is good, valuable advice, a reminder we could all use, maybe even worth the price of the book.

(Surely Joan Didion and Jordan Peterson could agree on John Wayne?)

Is it funny that stand up straight with your shoulders back is literally the opposite advice of :

(reminded of course of:

)  Greaney once claimed the secret to life is posture.  He’s rarely 100% wrong.

Is Jordan Peterson just a less chill Joseph Campbell?

If you are a lost young man may I suggest Joe Campbell will let you into a lot of the same insights in a way that may be less likely to prove distasteful to women you are trying to get with?

Joseph Campbell is cool

Very YouTubable and less into being aggro.


RIP Robert Hely

From The Telegraph, behind a paywall.  To my knowledge not a relative but sounds cool:

He established himself in the early 1960s just as celebrity “crimpers” were emerging from the salons to become arbiters of style, and the client list of the Hely Hair Studio included many eminent Glaswegians including footballers, models, the star of Gregory’s Girl, Clare Grogan, and the television presenter Ross King.


Uma’s example

into Uma’s example of not speaking in anger and waiting to be ready to speak on stuff.

feel like Twitter Internet etc. has made everyone feel like they need to have a Take on everything instantly.  I enjoy a good Take a much as anybody.  But feel like I can’t remember the last time I heard someone say “I need to reflect on this before I comment.”

Remembering that Uma’s father is a scholar of Buddhism.

The Man From Onion Valley. source.


The story of Profumo

In the early 1960s Michael Profumo was the British minister of defense.  He was also banging a party girl who was also banging a Russian spy.
at like big swinging sex parties.
He had to resign, disgraced.  But he handled it well.  Wife stuck by him.  Spent the next forty years cleaning toilets and working in East End soup kitchens.

Shortly after his resignation Profumo began to work as a volunteer cleaning toilets at Toynbee Hall, a charity based in the East End of London, and continued to work there for the rest of his life. Peter Hitchens has written that Profumo “vanished into London’s East End for 40 years, doing quiet good works”. Profumo “had to be persuaded to lay down his mop and lend a hand running the place”, eventually becoming Toynbee Hall’s chief fundraiser, and used his political skills and contacts to raise large sums of money. All this work was done as a volunteer, since Profumo was able to live on his inherited wealth. His wife, the actress Valerie Hobson, also devoted herself to charity until her death in 1998. In the eyes of most commentators, Profumo’s charity work redeemed his reputation. His friend, social reform campaigner Lord Longford said he “felt more admiration [for Profumo] than [for] all the men I’ve known in my lifetime”.

Right before he died the Queen invited him to dinner and had him sit next to her.
Like forty years of solid, humble repentance.
From his obituary:
Profumo’s dedication and dignity won him enormous admiration from people in all walks of life. The author Peter Hennessy, a fellow trustee at a charitable foundation associated with Toynbee Hall, described him as “one of the nicest and most exemplary people I have met in public or political life; full of the old, decent Tory virtues”. Margaret Thatcher called him “one of our national heroes”. “Everybody here worships him”, a helper at Toynbee Hall was once quoted as saying. “We think he’s a bloody saint.”