Heartlessness

saigyo

My friend Sammy on her Instagram posted some quotes from her boyfriend’s Zen calendar that were not helping.

Due to the turbulent times, Saigyō focuses not just on mono no aware (sorrow from change) but also on sabi (loneliness) and kanashi (sadness). Though he was a Buddhist monk, Saigyō was still very attached to the world and the beauty of nature.

Others elsewhere translate mono no aware as something like beautiful melancholy or a feeling of longing so agonizing it’s pleasure.

To be “heartless” was an ideal of Buddhist monkhood, meaning one had abandoned all desire and attachment.

From Saigyō’s Wikipedia page.

saigyo

Source. Public domain under Japanese law

Above we see Saigyō drawn by Kikuchi Yōsai, famous for his monochrome portraits of historical figures.

fullsizerender-12

 


Buffett

img_0002

Warren Buffett’s advice always sounds simple, which isn’t the same as easy to follow.
fullsizerender-9

fullsizerender-8

Loved the doc about him on HBO.  The first scene is him advising high school kids to take care of their minds and bodies.  The second scene is him in the drive-through line at McDonald’s.


Gem from Last Chance U coach

last-chance-u-3

Fair’s where you kiss a pig and give it a blue ribbon.

Massachusetts alt version: fair’s where you go to see a giant pumpkin.

Photo from the 2013 Topsfield Fair via Alex1961 on Flickr

Photo from the 2013 Topsfield Fair via Alex1961 on Flickr


Raise prices?

photo by Joe Pugliese for The New Yorker

photo by Joe Pugliese for The New Yorker, click through for source.  

Tim Ferriss: If you could have one billboard, anywhere with anything on it, what would you put on it? If you wanted to convey a short message to as many people as possible.

Marc Andreessen: I’ve got one, I’ve actually thought about hiring a skywriter to do this one. Right in the heart of San Francisco would be a billboard with just two words on it: Raise Prices.

TF: Raise prices?

MA: Yes. The number one thing – just the theme and we see it everywhere – the number one theme with our companies have when they get really struggling is they are not charging enough for their product. It has become absolutely conventional wisdom in Silicon Valley that the way to succeed is to price your product as low as possible under the theory that if it’s low-priced everybody can buy it and that’s how you get the volume. And we just see over and over and over again people failing with that because they get in the problem we call too hungry to eat. They don’t charge enough for their product to be able to afford the sales and marketing required to actually get anybody to buy it. And so they can’t afford to hire the sales rep to go sell the product. They can’t afford to buy the TV commercial, whatever it is. They cannot afford to go acquire the customers.

TF: Too hungry to eat.

MA: Too hungry to eat. And then they sit there and they don’t sell anything and then they get nervous and then they cut their prices.

TF: And then it’s a race to the bottom.

MA: It just makes the problem worse. And so, probably the single number one thing we try to get our companies to do is raise prices. By the way, it’s like, “Is your product any good if people won’t pay more for it?”

from here.  ReformedBroker warms that up with:

Good advice is worth multiples of what a client pays for it. Mediocre advice is not worth a little less, it’s worth nothing because it won’t be adhered to.


Mournbrag

Look, the nature of grieving is weird, how are you gonna judge how somebody grieves?  (but the typo?!)

This book:

WIT

first got me to really thinking about this.

George HW and Barbara Bush lost a daughter to pediatric leukemia when she was four years old.  Cramer says that something like half of all couples that lose a child split up, because the ways that two people grieve can be so divergent and impossible, even offensive, for the other person to deal with.  The Bushes were determined not to let that happen to them (and they didn’t).

The instinct on Twitter to make someone’s death an opportunity for backhanded aggrandizement sets my nerves on edge.  I’m not sure why that particular thing gnaws at me so much.  Maybe because the whole point of the death of a noble guy, or death at all, might be to remind us how unimportant we are, or to encourage us to be better?

(Hardly a perfect model here: when SDB died I both wanted to talk about him and myself and also at the same time never talk about it.)

This dude David Carr was incredible, his death was shocking, the number of people he seemed to have touched directly is staggering.  In New York in 2009 I was talking to a girl who told me more or less unprompted about truly moving kindnesses and generosity David Carr had extended to her just out of excellence of character and goodness of spirit.

I’ll miss reading the guy’s stuff.  I was just reading his thing about Brian Williams because I’m sure he’d have something to say worth hearing.

Now this is a tribute:

If you can only have one sentence of writing advice, go with this:

“Keep typing until it turns into writing”

If you are prepared for an intense experience on the subject of death and grieving, might I recommend the American Experience “Death And The Civil War”?

If you’re rushed for time, allow me to summarize: the Civil War was a tremendous bummer.


reblog from bookbinderlocal455

gotta remember this re: consuming internet.

stirs something within you

i think about this constantly in marfa, where there is a non-stop stream of performance and art, which sometimes rob one of time to pursue his/her own work. via pitchfork:

“One of the problems of our modern world is that there’s a lot of things to work through, but, at some point, everybody should take a pause from that and make something, so that it’s not just all one-way traffic. Human beings aren’t meant to be solely consumers—eventually, something has to come out. Otherwise, I don’t really see what the point of all that consumption is. The idea behind watching things and listening to things is that it stirs something within you, and hopefully that will stimulate you to then create your own thing.”

Jarvis Cocker

 


75 million people

 

That’s how many people speak Telugu, a language I hadn’t heard of until yesterday when correspondent J-Mac sent us this gem from his vast readings, with the following commentary:

Presented without commentary.

IMG_1233Thanks J-Mac!  Among the speakers of Telugu, Wikipedia tells me, are the Sri Lankan Gypsy people:

They make their living by fortune telling, snake charming and using monkeys and dogs in performances.

India: interesting.

IMG_0751