Linda Siddick Napaltjinpa is the new Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri?

source

Sounds like it, from this review by Sarah Grisin, in the Canberra Times, of the show up at ANU.

Unlikely I’ll make it to Canberra by Dec. 16.  Somebody go for me!


How many kangaroos do you think live in Australia?

Learned this the other day reading The Economist.

 

Are you ready?

 

47 million.

Mate that’s nearly two roos per person!


They’re at it again in Australia

 

Sent via our Australian department via the Washington Post.  It seems deputy PM Barnaby Joyce knocked up his staffer:

Joyce responded by calling his sometime ally the PM “inept.”

 


Dreamtime and Dreaming

This book is absolutely great.  A+.  

Read it because my explorations of Aboriginal art

led me to want to know more about the Dreamtime and the Dreaming concept.

Stanner is so thoughtful and patient.  This book is worth it for the essay on Aboriginal humor alone:

What do Aborigines think is funny?

One of Stanner’s points is the “abiding” quality of Aboriginal life: the sense that the world is not necessary here for us to change and improve it.  As Robert Manne says in his intro,

for them changelessness was both the desired and the anticipated state of the world.

Very pleased this book was published by my own Australian publisher, Black Inc Books

Leading lights of Australian lit.  

Some of W. E. H. Stanner’s essays were originally published by Australian National University Press as White Man Got No Dreaming (1979).  That’s not true, I thought, so I picked up a book about white man’s dreaming.

We certainly do have different ways of thinking about dreaming, and Dreamtime. 

 


Rupert

Murdoch is, in person, charming. Everyone agrees. You get a glimpse of this in the account of working for him written by Philip Townsend, who was his butler in London during the 1980s. (Townsend had a dog who died, and whom he kept in Murdoch’s freezer.) When Murdoch made the switch to living more healthily – influenced by the fact that his father died at 67 – he did so by announcing to his butler: ‘Phil, I’m into yin and yang and all that shit.’ This charm is no small factor in his success, and comes across in many of the stories people tell about him, and in some of the things he says about himself. ‘I am sober after lunch, and in some parts of Fleet Street, that makes you a genius,’ he once said.

from this 2004 roundup on Rupert Murdoch by the great John Lanchester.

 


Dispatch from Down Under

Asked our correspondent Barcelona Jim in Sydney to sum up of what’s up down there.  He writes:

Australasian Politics has had a dose of Trump style mix ups, send ups, controversies, ejections and elections and chaotic decisions in this last week.

In a short period that involves New Zealand as much as it involves scandals, the new Prime Minister of NZ was told by the media she had won the election whilst painting her back fence in her track pants.
Ardern got straight to work, looking seeming bored when receiving a congratulatory call from President Trump, but had an enjoyable conversation with a journalist phoning her team to ask the correct pronunciation of “Ardern” – only to get straight through to the PM herself to have a genial chat.
Meanwhile – Australia is in an uproar about a long forgotten amendment to our constitution, Article 22.
This states that members of parliament cannot hold dual citizenship.
Beginning with a right-wing party calling out a left-wing member the news achieved enough attention to call the deputy PM of Australia, Barnaby Joyce, along with several others into question.

(Barnaby seems like a real prize pig)
In a decision handed out yesterday by the high court of Australia, Barnaby and four other senators are foisted out, leaving the opposing party with no longer a majority.
Meanwhile the previously mentioned party organised a federal police raid on the opposing party’s Australian Worker’s Union, but was tipped off by media leading to a Federal Investigation and a resigning of at least one staffer and possibly a leading member.
Many members, senators, leaders of parliament are in a current flutter of back-stabbing, investigations, constitutional rediscovery.
If this sounds confusing… It is.
Best of wishes to Mueller.
Asked for a follow up with a summary of the Manus issue:
Meanwhile, in New Zealand:
 Charlotte Graham in the New York Times reports that a former member of the Chinese Communist Party got elected to Parliament:

Mr. Yang admitted that in the 1980s and early ’90s, before emigrating to Australia and then moving to New Zealand to teach at a university, he studied and taught at two Chinese educational institutions run by the People’s Liberation Army, China’s armed forces.

He said he had not named the Chinese military institutions on his application for New Zealand citizenship, and had instead listed “partner institutions” as his employers, because that was what the Chinese “system” had told him to do.

Mr. Yang conceded that he had taught English to spies, but said he had never been a spy himself, was no longer a member of the Communist Party, and had been contracted and paid only as a so-called civilian officer.

Mr. Yang has not been officially investigated in New Zealand or charged with espionage.

But Nicholas Eftimiades, a former officer with the Central Intelligence Agency with extensive experience on China matters, said the title of civilian officer was a fluid one in China.

Mr. Eftimiades, now a lecturer at Penn State Harrisburg in Pennsylvania, said officers moved seamlessly between military and civilian assignments to include Chinese army units and work in the defense industry, think tanks and universities.

Is China getting its spies elected to parliaments?  Gotta respect the move if so.
Will World War III be an Info Wars?
Has it already begun?
And:
Plus you must follow Australia’s Parliament House on Twitter:
That’s what’s happening in Australasia
where the constellations change but the mind stays the same.

Water Dreaming at Kalipinya

Says the 2001 NYTimes obituary of painter Johnny Warangkua Tjupurrula:

He died a penniless alcoholic. In 1997 one of his paintings, ”Water Dreaming at Kalipinya,” which he had sold in 1972 for $75, changed hands at a Sotheby’s auction in Melbourne for $263,145, setting a record for any Aboriginal work of art. Mr. Tjupurrula’s request for 4 percent of the sale price was refused by both seller and buyer.

Not cool!  From a 2010 Smithsonian article by Arthur Lubow:

The Wilkersons’ costliest board was the 1972 painting Water Dreaming at Kalipinypa, a dazzling patchwork of stippled, dotted and crosshatched shapes, bought in 2000 for some $220,000—more than twice the price it had been auctioned for only three years earlier. The painting was done by Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula, an original member of the Papunya cooperative and one of its most celebrated. Sadly, the artist himself had long been overlooked; in 1997, an Australian journalist found Warangkula, by then old and homeless, sleeping along with other Aboriginal people in a dry riverbed near Alice Springs. Though he reportedly received less than $150 for his best-known painting, the publicity surrounding the 1997 sale revived his career somewhat and he soon resumed painting. Warangkula died in a nursing home in 2001.

Here’s his 1972 painting Potato Dreaming: