Bungaree

Bungaree, by Augustus Earle

Although in 1801-2 Bungaree had accompanied Flinders on his circumnavigation of Australia, he was best known in Sydney in the 1820s for his extravagant mimicry of successive colonial governors.  Earle dpecits Bungaree in a parodic gesture of welcome, wearing his characteristic dress (cast off uniform)…

from The Oxford History of Art series volume on Australian Art by Andrew Sayers.

I got a used one from a library.

What’s going on up there at Cogswell College?

Cogswell specializes in digital animation and video game design. Its computer graphics degree program is the longest-running in the Bay Area. It includes Project X, an invitation-only animated film production course that approximates the experience of interning in the industry.

Are you kidding me?!  Those  people most need to know about Bungaree!

Have a great Labor Day weekend everybody.

Group of girl workers at the gate of the American Tobacco Co. Young girls obviously under 14 years of age, who work about 10 hours every day except Saturday, May 1910 source

 

 


Meanwhile in Australia

It started when Greens leader Richard Di Natale called Nationals Senator Barry O’Sullivan an “absolute pig”, after the Senator said there was a “bit of Nick Xenophon in” Ms Hanson-Young.

“He’s an absolute pig. He should be booted out. He’s a disgrace,” Mr Di Natale shouted across the chamber. “You grub.”

An emotional Senator Hanson-Young said Senator O’Sullivan and conservative independents Fraser Anning, Cory Bernardi and David Leyonhjelm were “cowards” who had spent months levelling slurs at her.

“You are not fit to be in this chamber. You are not fit to call yourselves men,” Senator Hanson-Young said.

She backed the Greens leader for calling out Senator O’Sullivan’s “reprehensible” remarks.

“That is what real men do. Real men don’t insult and threaten women,” Senator Hanson-Young said.

“You grub.”

Enjoy reading news stories about the goings-on in other English speaking countries, you usually have to fill in the gaps just enough to piece together what’s happening.

(thanks to our Sydney correspondent for the link and background)


Linda Siddick Napaltjinpa is the new Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri?

source

Sounds like it, from this review by Sarah Grisin, in the Canberra Times, of the show up at ANU.

Unlikely I’ll make it to Canberra by Dec. 16.  Somebody go for me!


How many kangaroos do you think live in Australia?

Learned this the other day reading The Economist.

 

Are you ready?

 

47 million.

Mate that’s nearly two roos per person!


They’re at it again in Australia

 

Sent via our Australian department via the Washington Post.  It seems deputy PM Barnaby Joyce knocked up his staffer:

Joyce responded by calling his sometime ally the PM “inept.”

 


Dreamtime and Dreaming

This book is absolutely great.  A+.  

Read it because my explorations of Aboriginal art

led me to want to know more about the Dreamtime and the Dreaming concept.

Stanner is so thoughtful and patient.  This book is worth it for the essay on Aboriginal humor alone:

What do Aborigines think is funny?

One of Stanner’s points is the “abiding” quality of Aboriginal life: the sense that the world is not necessary here for us to change and improve it.  As Robert Manne says in his intro,

for them changelessness was both the desired and the anticipated state of the world.

Very pleased this book was published by my own Australian publisher, Black Inc Books

Leading lights of Australian lit.  

Some of W. E. H. Stanner’s essays were originally published by Australian National University Press as White Man Got No Dreaming (1979).  That’s not true, I thought, so I picked up a book about white man’s dreaming.

We certainly do have different ways of thinking about dreaming, and Dreamtime. 

 


Rupert

Murdoch is, in person, charming. Everyone agrees. You get a glimpse of this in the account of working for him written by Philip Townsend, who was his butler in London during the 1980s. (Townsend had a dog who died, and whom he kept in Murdoch’s freezer.) When Murdoch made the switch to living more healthily – influenced by the fact that his father died at 67 – he did so by announcing to his butler: ‘Phil, I’m into yin and yang and all that shit.’ This charm is no small factor in his success, and comes across in many of the stories people tell about him, and in some of the things he says about himself. ‘I am sober after lunch, and in some parts of Fleet Street, that makes you a genius,’ he once said.

from this 2004 roundup on Rupert Murdoch by the great John Lanchester.