How much would you pay for this painting?

Basquiat’s “Pink Elephant with Fire Engine,” depicting cartoonish images on yolk-colored background, hammered at 2.2 million pounds, falling short of the low estimate of 3 million pounds.

Bad luck for A-Rod!

 


The Glorious First of June

painted here by Philip James de Loutherbourg, who sounds cool as shit:

a Franco-British painter who became known for his large naval works, his elaborate set designs for London theatres, and his invention of a mechanical theatre called the “Eidophusikon”. He also had an interest in faith-healing and the occult and was a companion of the confidence-trickster Cagliostro.


Vivian Maier

stole that straight from Artnet.

The tale of who owns Vivian Maier’s work is interesting.  Through some twists, John Maloof, the Chicago real estate developer (?) who found and bought most of the physical photos at a storage auction, does not at present own the copyright:

Until those heirs are determined, the Cook County Administrator will continue to serve as the supervisor of the Maier Estate.


Go Inside

They’re making progress on the dome/orb that will one day hold the Academy Museum (motto: Go Inside The Movies).

At neighboring LACMA the American Outliers exhibit is terrific.

The Great Good Man by Marsden Hartley of Lewiston, Maine.

Struck by Horace Pippin’s John Brown Going To His Hanging:

Pippin served in K Company, 3rd Battalion of the 369th infantry, the famous Harlem Hellfighters, in Europe during World War I, where he lost the use of his right arm after being shot by a sniper. He said of his combat experience:

I did not care what or where I went. I asked God to help me, and he did so. And that is the way I came through that terrible and Hellish place. For the whole entire battlefield was hell, so it was no place for any human being to be.

While in the trenches, Pippin kept an illustrated journal which gave an account of his military service.

How about this one, Miss Van Alen:

attributed to “The Ganesvoort Limner (possibly Pieter Vanderlyn).”

Generally untrained and itinerant, limners were a class of artists who helped shape the image of colonial Americans, securing the social status of their middle-class sitters in portraits that convey an air of refinement.

says The National Gallery.

Proposed motto for LACMA: Go Inside The Art.


Sunday Scrapbasket

  • Work by Ai Weiwei at Marciano Foundation:
  • down the docks, San Pedro:
  • Good illustration of Satan in the Wikipedia page for him:

from Strange Tales From A Chinese Studio (1740) by Pu Songling

  • Looking into the history of the USA and Chile, found this.

  Declassified notes Richard Helms, CIA director, took at a September 15, 1970 meeting at the White House

game plan

make the economy scream

  • This is a take I didn’t know I had until I saw it expressed:

of course.  these rascals hired her and they knew who she was.  it didn’t work for them like it did for Fox so they threw her under the bus, but they’re no more principled than she is.

  • moving books around:

 

  • happy fate to be in attendance at the longest World Series game ever played.  Beginning:

End:

 


Thalia

Whenever I need a boost in either comedy or idyllic poetry I just call upon the muse Thalia


Gods of the Modern World and the Cartoon History Of The Universe

José Clemente Orozco painted these crazy frescos at Dartmouth around 1933.  My pal Larry Gonick sends a vivid closeup:

photo: Larry Gonick

Gotta check these out.  If you haven’t read Larry Gonick’s Cartoon History Of The Universe:

Strongest recommend!  Epic achievements in bringing history to life by both artists.