Hovenweep

What a name for a place.

between 1150-1350 these structures were built in, around, and above this canyon:

Gotta check that out sometime:

Was this era in the American Southwest something like roughly the same period, the early 12th century in Ireland:

To be glib, early medieval Ireland sounds like a somewhat crazed Wisconsin, in which every dairy farm is an armed at perpetual war with its neighbors, and every farmer claims he is a king.

Or was Hovenweep perhaps something more like a monastery?

Some Anasazi taking the Benedict Option?

Thought this was a good trip report from Hovenweep.

Got to Hovenweep trying to read about traditional architecture in the American desert regions. What kinds of buildings have people with few tools and tech built?  What lasts?

This guy took on the challenge of building a pit house and kiva.

Easier than a kiva would be a false kiva:

John Fowler for wikipedia

 

 


Cleanin’ out my DVR

IMG_8876One of the local public broadcasting stations here in SoCal aired an episode of the Berenstain Bears in Lakota.

The Lakota language represents one of the largest Native American language speech communities in the United States, with approximately 6,000 speakers living mostly in northern plains states of North Dakota and South Dakota.


Sitting Bull Part 2

That detail about the meadowlark is from Nathaniel Philbrick, The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull and The Battle of The Little Bighorn.  At best the second-best book about the Little Bighorn battle, first of course being:

but that image is amazing.  Good on Philbrick.

What is amazing about “Son Of The Morning Star” is Connell doesn’t just tell the story, he follows the meandering lines that lead to it and out of it, and the people who traced them.  He demonstrates that as soon as you focus on any particular incident, you can keep finding new dimensions of weirdness in it.

Take, for example, this meadowlark warning Sitting Bull.  Philbrick cites that detail as coming from the recollections of One Bull, Sitting Bull’s nephew, found in box 104, folder 21 of the Walter Campbell collection.  Walter Campbell was born in Severy, Kansas in 1887.  He was the first Rhodes Scholar from the state of Oklahoma.  He wrote under the name Stanley Vestal.  Why?  I don’t know.  According to the University of Oklahoma, where his collection is kept, he was adopted by Sitting Bull’s family, and “was named Makes-Room or Make-Room-For-Him (Kiyukanpi) and His Name Is Everywhere (Ocastonka). Kiyukanpi was the name of Joseph White Bull’s father, and Ocastonka is a reference to the Chief’s great fame.”

Here’s a picture from the Walter Campbell collection:

That’s Young Man Afraid Of His Horses. Here’s another:

Regrettably OU won’t let me make that any bigger.  Campbell/Vestal/His-Name-Is-Everywhere died of a heart attack on Christmas Day, 1957.

There’s also a Walter CAMP who is very important in Bighorniana.  Camp worked for the railroad, and so could travel all over.  An unsourced detail from Indiana University’s Camp collection is that this is how he “spent his summers,” finding lost battlefields and interviewing old Indians and soldiers.  Here is a picture from Camp’s collection:

As for One Bull, here he is.  This is a photograph by William Cross (which I found here):

On wikipedia’s page for One Bull, however, they illustrate him with a picture of his spoon:

This spoon is now in the Spurlock Museum, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaigne, where they also have collections of Japanese wood carvings, Arctic artifacts, and Babylonian clay tablets.


Sitting Bull

In August of 1890, Sitting Bull left his home to check on his ponies.  After walking more than three miles, he climbed to the top of a hill, where he heard a voice.  A meadowlark was speaking to him from a nearby knoll.  “Lakotas will kill you,” the little bird said.