Conan on Hans Gruber

from this Vulture interview


Loved this comparison

As Zinoman puts it, “His smirking tone was so consistently knowing that he seemed as if he must know something.”  This was an attitude fit for the cynical mood of the 1980s, and Zinoman emphasizes Letterman’s significance as an avatar of cool noncommitment, a figure of his time.  In that, Letterman resembled that other pop-cultural phenomenon of the era, Jim Davis’s Garfield – the rotund cartoon feline also riven by self-doubt and haunted by grandiose fantasies of domination while projecting an aloofness that often verged on the cruel.

from Naomi Fry’s review of Jason Zinoman’s Letterman: The Last Giant of Late Night in the Summer 2017 issue of BookForum.  (A little behind on my Bookforum).


To My House Guest:

If you found a note on a scrap of paper in my house that said “Maybe I can stop masturbating” on it I promise it was related to an upcoming work of television comedy.

Enjoy VEEP on Sundays at 10:30pm and then on HBO Go forever!


Huell can’t take it


Ed Harris in Westworld, Ed Harris in Walker

If you enjoy Ed Harris in Westworld, as I do, you may be curious to have a look at his role in Walker (1987) in which he plays a similarly attired character:

walker

Harris plays the real life William Walker who went down to Nicaragua with some armed guys and declared himself president there from 1856-1857.

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I went down to Nicaragua and visited some of the places Walker shot up.

nic-bar

I tell the story of Walker, and of Nicaragua, and of the troubled film

nic-house

in my book, THE WONDER TRAIL: True Stories From Los Angeles To The End Of The World

treee

available at Amazon or your local indie bookstore.  You’ll enjoy it.

 

 


Westworld semi-theory

westworld

SPOILER warning


Arnold

Bernard

Charlie

Dolores

Elsie

The order in which they were made?


Magnum, Everyman

img_8221 magnum

from Wiki as I prep a Halloween costume.

In real life more going for Robin Masters, “the celebrated-but-never-seen author of several dozen lurid novels.”

A recurrent theme throughout the last two seasons, starting in the episode “Paper War”, involves Magnum’s sneaking suspicion that Higgins is actually Robin Masters since he opens Robin’s mail, calls Robin’s Ferrari “his car”, etc. This suspicion is never proved or disproved, although in at least one episode – “Déjà-Vu” S06E02 – Higgins is shown alone in a room, picking up the ringing phone and talking to Robin Masters, indicating they are two different persons.