He’s like an old doughnut seller

Stop, stop.  Do not speak.

From:

A good one from Penguin.

Myself, I find stuff worth pondering in Gateless Gate:

(you can skip Mumon’s comment if you want, it’s not on the quiz)

Make up your own mind:


Today’s I Ching

In some translations springtime is rendered as Long June

from:

the only book I’ll ever need?!

if I want to learn more about China I can pick up this month’s Westways:

Lol did somebody pitch Westways “how about a story about China?”

WESTWAYS EDITOR: what angle?

PITCHER: Everything from cities to cuisine!  All the facets!

EDITOR: All?!

PITCHER: Well, many facets.

EDITOR: Is there enough there?

PITCHER: I think so.  Did you know it is a 5,000 year old civilization?

EDITOR: Wow!  OK let’s also have a piece on Iceland and car racing for amateurs and I think we’re good!


A field hospital after a battle


US Air Force Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron members monitor patients during a C-17 aero-medical evacuation mission from Balad Air Base, Iraq, to Ramstein Air Base, Germany. U.S. Air Force Photo/Master Sgt. Scott Reed

Something about the health care debate got me pondering Pope Francis’ quote in a 2013 interview that the Church should be like a field hospital after a battle.

“I can clearly see that what the Church needs today is the ability to heal wounds and warm the hearts of faithful, it needs to be by their side. I see the Church as a field hospital after a battle. It’s pointless to ask a seriously injured patient whether his cholesterol or blood sugar levels are high! It’s his wounds that need to be healed. The rest we can talk about later. Now we must think about treating those wounds. And we need to start from the bottom.”

“Savage Station VA field hospital after the battle of June 27” in the Library of Congress, photographer James Gibson

There’s a lot of good writing about field hospitals after battles.  Walt Whitman and Hemingway both saw some firsthand.  Or how about

I never really watched MASH tbh and got kinda sad when it would come on instead of something more fun.


Arabic

 

arabic

The challenge:arabic-1

How to react:
arabic-2


Hadith

satans-fart

Reading some of the sayings of The Prophet, the Hadith, in Thomas Cleary’s translation:

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A word of warning for PEOTUS:

wealth


These hysterical sluts

IMG_8480Finally getting down to this one.  Not all old philosophical classics are easy reading but Boethius gets off to a rip-roaring start.  He’s got the Muses of Poetry at his bedside trying to cheer him up when all of a sudden Philosophy appears:

IMG_8482 IMG_8483

Philosophy is like

listenupfives

A lot of credit is probably due to the translator, Victor Watts.  He sounds like just the man for the job:

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Interaction Ritual Chains

IMG_8424Got interested in the sociologist Randall Collins via his blog, which I think Tyler Cowen linked to.

Collins also wrote a book about violence.

Violence

If you find yourself in a bar fight, his main advice on avoiding “damage” seems to be:

1) maintain calm, steady eye contact.

2) speak in a calm clear assertive voice

3) assert emotional dominance, or at least hold your own, emotional dominance-wise.

Most of the damage gets done, says Collins (who watched hundreds of hours of tapes of bar fights) when you’ve already lost the emotional encounter.  Even worse if there’s a crowd.

At the heart of Collins’ micro-sociological theory is the concept of “confrontational tension.” As people enter into an antagonistic interactional situation, their fear/tension is heightened. These emotions become a roadblock to violence, and so flight and stalemate often result. Actual violence only occurs when pathways around this roadblock can be found that lead people into a “tunnel of violence.” Collins identifies several pathways into this tunnel, the most dangerous of which is “forward panic.” In these situations, the confrontational tension builds up and is suddenly released so that it spills forward into atrocities ranging from the Rodney King beating to the My Lai massacre, the rape of Nanking, and the Rwandan genocide. Other ways around the stalemate of confrontational tension are to attack a weak victim (e.g., domestic violence) or to be encouraged by an audience (e.g., lynch mobs). Clearly, these pathways can also be combined, as when a schoolyard bully is encouraged by a crowd of classmates or when forward panic is stimulated by a group of bystanders.

Best posts from his blog, I’d say:

Napoleon

this one, on Napoleon and emotional energy.

this one, on Tank Man, is very interesting (although it goes against some other ideas I’ve heard, like Filip Hammar’s claim that it was well-known in his neighborhood of Beijing that Tank Man had been binge-drinking for days leading up to this event.)

LoA

this one, about fame, network bridging, and Lawrence of Arabia, is just fantastic.

jc

So’s this one, about what we can learn from the gospel accounts of Jesus about charisma.

MBD

This one about Moby-Dick and bullfighting had some really interesting, new to me ideas.

I bought Professor Collins’ ebook, about emotional energy in Napoleon, Steve Jobs, and Alexander the Great.  Lots of good stuff in there.  And I got his magnum Interaction Ritual Chains.  That’s a bit drier, but I’m learning a lot:

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