RIP Robert Hely

From The Telegraph, behind a paywall.  To my knowledge not a relative but sounds cool:

He established himself in the early 1960s just as celebrity “crimpers” were emerging from the salons to become arbiters of style, and the client list of the Hely Hair Studio included many eminent Glaswegians including footballers, models, the star of Gregory’s Girl, Clare Grogan, and the television presenter Ross King.


Love Andrew Sullivan but…

Rolled my eyes at this week’s essay title.

If your job is writing a weekly essay and going on Bill Maher, then YOU live on campus.  Not seeing evidence the rest of us do?

 


JAB Holdings

 

and soon:

and

are all controlled by JAB Holdings.

Owned by Germany’s Reimann family, 95% of JAB Holding belongs to four of the late Albert Reimann Jr.’s nine adopted children. They are descendants of chemist Ludwig Reimann, who, in 1828, joined with Johann Adam Benckiser (founder of the namesake chemical company).

Allegedly, the heirs take an oath never to discuss their business publicly?

 


Quincy

Devouring this Quincy Jones Vulture interview like everyone else on my feed.  Graeme Wood has a good take:

There was also, as Icecubetray points out, an interview in GQ recently where QJ goes similarly wild:


Coaching Matchup: Super Bowl LII

Beginning with a 2015 look at the positivist philosophies of Pete Carroll , we’ve written some on top-level football coaches and coaching philosophy here at Helytimes.

Our Reader found less charm in Nick Saban’s book:

but did learn what Nick Saban eats for breakfast.

The Super Bowl matchup between Ron Rivera and Gary Kubiak proved one of the least charismatic coaching duels in memory but Our Correspondent found some points of interest in Rivera’s Control Your APE philosophy

King of Coaches is Bill Belichick.  We reviewed the best book on him back in 2015.

Last year’s Dan Quinn / Belichick matchup provided a political contrast, noted by Our Correspondent.

Jan 19, 2016; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Philadelphia Eagles new head coach Doug Pederson is introduced to the media at the NovaCare Complex . Mandatory Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

This year Belichick faces goofball Doug Pederson, who once had his jaw broken while playing as Brett Favre’s backup:

Pederson never started a game with the Packers and threw for only three touchdowns in his seven seasons. Two of them came against the Vikings on Oct. 5, 1998, when he replaced Favre in a blowout loss. On the second of his two touchdown passes, Pederson suffered a broken jaw thanks to a hit from corner Corey Fuller.

He would need his jaw wired shut after the game, but he still took the field for the next play because he was Longwell’s holder on extra points.

“He kind of mumbled, ‘Something’s wrong with my jaw,’ but he got the hold down, and we made the kick,” Longwell said.

so reports Rob Demovsky at ESPN.

Can’t find too much of interest in the Doug Pederson literature, but I do think it’s cool that ten years ago he was coaching high school:

The former Louisiana Monroe graduate retired in March of 2005 and accepted a job as head football coach at Calvary Baptist Academy in Shreveport, La., which has 900 students in the K-12 school.

“I thoroughly love it,” Pederson said. “I get a chance to share my faith with these guys and teach them things on and off the field.”

(from this Packers.com story by Jeff Fedotin)

Good luck to both coaches!


Drop the mic!

from Politico


In A Narrow Grave

In anticipation of a trip to Texas, I got this one off the shelf.  Neither McMurtry’s best (that would be Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, in which he gives a recipe for lime Dr. Pepper) or his worst (that would be Paradise, where he proves his point that Tahiti is boring), in this fan’s opinion.

McMurtry’s essay on the sexual attitudes of the post-frontier Texas of his youth is pretty interesting:

He also says it wasn’t a big deal in his youth for a young man to have sex with a cow or pig.