Dune

img_0099

img_0101

Let’s learn about Frank Herbert, author of Dune.

img_0100

In WWII he was a Seebee:

720px-usn-seabees-insignia-svg

I think about the Seabees every time I drive up the Pacific Coast Highway and hit their base at Port Hueneme:

The idea for Dune came from dunes.

He later told Willis E. McNelly that the novel originated when he was supposed to do a magazine article on sand dunes in the Oregon Dunes near Florence, Oregon.

Source. Photo by Sam Beebe.

Source. Photo by Sam Beebe.

He became too involved and ended up with far more raw material than needed for an article. The article was never written, but instead planted the seed that led to Dune.

Source. Photo by Rebecca Kennison

Source. Photo by Rebecca Kennison

Dune was first published by Chilton Company, known for its auto repair manuals:

Sterling E. Lanier, an editor of Chilton Book Company (known mainly for its auto-repair manuals) had read the Dune serials and offered a $7,500 advance plus future royalties for the rights to publish them as a hardcover book.

Great take on writing from a man who generated many books:

A man is a fool not to put everything he has, at any given moment, into what he is creating. You’re there now doing the thing on paper. You’re not killing the goose, you’re just producing an egg. So I don’t worry about inspiration, or anything like that. It’s a matter of just sitting down and working. I have never had the problem of a writing block. I’ve heard about it. I’ve felt reluctant to write on some days, for whole weeks, or sometimes even longer. I’d much rather go fishing, for example, or go sharpen pencils, or go swimming, or what not. But, later, coming back and reading what I have produced, I am unable to detect the difference between what came easily and when I had to sit down and say, “Well, now it’s writing time and now I’ll write.” There’s no difference on paper between the two.[15]

— Frank Herbert
Lifted straight from Wikipedia. A vivid storyteller:

PLOWBOY: So you think our country’s methods of instruction have a lot to do with the destruction of many family values?

HERBERT: Absolutely. By the time you have three or four generations of people who are taught not to trust their families and their families’ knowledge, individuals can really become separated from their roots. The effect is to make people feel like lost wanderers, or to cause them to think of themselves only in the role of their jobs, which is a complete misrepresentation of what it means to be alive.

Another lesson I learned in childhood is that what people do is just as important as—and maybe more so than—what they say. I had a marvelous object lesson in the difference between words and actions when I was in fourth grade. In those days I was bored to death by school, so I tended to cause a lot of trouble.

One day our teacher, a great big woman who wore eye-glasses that looked like the bottoms of pop bottles, caught me in the middle of a particularly heinous prank. She told me to stay after school and added, “I just don’t know what I’m going to do with you.”

Of course, I could imagine all kinds of horrible things she might do to me. Like the bastinado, or worse! But when school was over, she just made me sit and sit while she worked on papers. After what seemed like ages, she motioned me up to her desk, stared at me awhile—I could feel two holes being burned right through me—and then resumed her paperwork.

PLOWBOY: You must have been terrified.

HERBERT: Oh, I was. Finally, she put her pencil down and said, “I just don’t know what I’m going to do with you.” Well, it was all too much for me. I started to cry. She put her face right in front of mine then and said again!—”I just don’t know what I’m going to do with you.” And I said through my sobs, “Why are you mad at me?”

With that, she grabbed me by the shoulders, began shaking me roughly, and cried, “I’m not mad at you, I’m not mad at you!” Well, I now know that teachers get long lectures during their training on the importance of keeping their tempers with their students, so I had said exactly the wrong thing to this woman. I may not have understood that at the time, but I didn’t have a bit of trouble realizing that my teacher—who was repeatedly screaming, “I’m not mad at you!”—was nearly out of her mind with rage.

That incident drove home the lesson that what people say often doesn’t agree with what they actually do. And that discovery played a big part in the shaping my thinking and behavior.

from an interview with Pat Stone in a 1981 issue of Mother Earth news.  Another gem:

I intend to add a solar collector over our swimming pool building to heat its water … and—for a time—I even raised chickens to provide manure for my methane experiments.

Herbert on government:

PLOWBOY: You feel that Kennedy was dangerous and Nixon was good for the country?

HERBERT: Yes, Nixon taught us one hell of a lesson, and I thank him for it. He made us distrust government leaders. We didn’t mistrust Kennedy the way we did Nixon, although we probably had just as good reason to do so. But Nixon’s downfall was due to the fact that he wasn’t charismatic. He had to be sold just like Wheaties, and people were disappointed when they opened the box.

I think it’s vital that men and women learn to mistrust all forms of powerful, centralized authority. Big government tends to create an enormous delay between the signals that come from the people and the response of the leaders. Put it this way: Suppose there were a delay time of five minutes between the moment you turned the steering wheel on your car and the time the front tires reacted. What would happen in such a case?

PLOWBOY: I guess I’d have to drive pretty slowly.

HERBERT: V-e-rrrrrrr-y slowly. Governments have the same slow-response effect. And the bigger the government, the more slowly it reacts. So to me, the best government is one that’s very responsive to the needs of its people. That is, the least, loosest, and most local government.

On the future:

PLOWBOY: But you feel pretty sure humankind will be able to make the necessary changes?

HERBERT: I think they’ll be forced on us. Oh, we’ll make some mistakes. We’ll probably have a number of fanatic leaders and such to deal with in the years to come. I don’t see the future as being all sweetness and light, by any means. Learning from mistakes is a very slow process. It may take us 20,000 or 25,000 years to get to where, I feel, we have to go.

Herbert lived in Port Townsend, Washington for some time, not far from Cape Flattery.  I find this picture on PT’s wikipedia page:

Depicted here is one of the wives of Cheech Ma Ham:

 He has a ferry named after him.
source, photo by Compdude123

source, photo by Compdude123

Jodowarsky’s Dune is a must watch.  Last I checked it was free on Netflix:


Cash Me Outside –> Whales

Late to the party on Cash Me Outside Girl.

I was walking by the Dr. Phil studio the other day, saw an audience lined up, and it dawned to me this must be the literal outside where she intended to be cashed.

fullsizerender-10

The mural is by Wyland, king of whale murals.  He has done one hundred.

The artist Wyland, who goes by only one name, paints a mural on Charlie Barracks, a former military barracks still in use on Midway. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument January 2012 Photo: Pete Leary/USFWS

The artist Wyland, who goes by only one name, paints a mural on Charlie Barracks, a former military barracks still in use on Midway. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument January 2012 Photo: Pete Leary/USFWS

Seeing this sight reminded me of the time I went to see The Hunger Games and walked past a long line of people waiting in the sun to be on Dancing With The Stars and I realized oh we are in The Hunger Games.


Huell can’t take it


Edelman learns Super Bowl has ended

seen on Inside The NFL on Showtime.


A real shot

Ryan then took questions. This was the first one: “The President made some new false statements yesterday, notably that there are major terrorist attacks that the media, essentially, isn’t covering. Are you getting concerned at all about his grasp of the truth?”

Ryan shrugged his shoulders.

[…finally he answers]

“Look,” he said. “I’m going to do my job. I’ll let you guys do yours with respect to how you report, or what you don’t report. The problem is we do have a war on terror in front of us. We do have isis trying to conduct terror attacks across the globe. This is a real serious problem. And what I am focussed on is doing our job and making sure our law-enforcement authorities, our military, have the tools to keep us safe.”

from this NYer piece by the great John Cassidy.

Paul Ryan has a real shot at going down in history as a pristine example of cynical soul-selling.

Are the Republicans really for:

  • the importance of virtue, morality, religious faith, stability, character and so on in the individual
  • sexual morality or what came to be termed “family values”
  • the importance of education to inculcate good character and to teach the fundamentals that have defined knowledge in the West for millennia
  • societal norms and public order
  • the centrality of initiative, enterprise, industry, and thrift to a sound economy and a healthy society
  • the soul-sapping effects of paternalistic Big Government and its cannibalization of civil society and religious institutions
  • a strong defense and prudent statesmanship in the international sphere

I didn’t pluck those out of thin air, those are exactly what Michael Anton, Bannon advisor, says conservatives should be for in this essay, The Flight 93 Election, his pre-election argument for DT.

Is DT making things better, stronger, or greater on any of those fronts?  How’s his prudent statesmanship?  What message does he send on virtue, morality, character, stability?  He’s rich (maybe) but does he demonstrate industry and thrift?  How’s he on education to inculcate good character and teach the fundamentals that have defined knowledge in the West for millennia?  “Family values?”

The Republican Party did this to us.  Reince Priebus, Trump chief of staff, is an old Wisconsin buddy of Paul Ryan.

The best case is Paul Ryan is trading all the other values for fighting “the soul-sapping effects of paternalistic Big Government and its cannibalization of civil society and religious institutions” but even he must know by now he’s fighting cannibalism by signing up with a bigger, worse cannibal.

Best case for Ryan is he makes it harder for people to pay for health care first.

Good luck!  Get ‘im, Scott Pelley!


His sporting blood turned to horsepiss

portis-eb-white

This interview with Charles Portis, on his days a young reporter, for an oral history project about the Arkansas Gazette newspaper is so wonderful.

Lady stringers:

lady-stringers

On Tom Wolfe and Malcolm X:

portis-on-tom-wolfe-andmalcom-x

They made movies out of several Portis books:

is one and

is another.

What does Charles Portis make of all this I wonder?

mofa

Click on this link for an amazing picture of William Woodruff sailing up the Mississippi with his printing presses.


We are better than this

User magicpiano on Wikipedia

User magicpiano on Wikipedia

NOTE: Per a conversation with a Catholic sister in New Hampshire who sometimes teaches Helytimes posts to her advanced English class, I’ve cleaned up some language here. 

The goal should be to raise the discourse.  

62,418,820 Americans voted for him.  All those people are not dumb jerks.

c5fd02cf-8ada-4829-9a84-04085f0f2f74

 

Many bad people in my experience end up with exactly the punishment they deserve

Many bad people in my experience end up with exactly the punishment they deserve

This is a mess and a shame.

Part of our job as citizens for the rest of our lives will be undoing this disgrace and bringing some honor back to this country.  USA has done much that’s staggeringly, tears to your eyes amazing and heroic and noble.

800px-john_w-_young_on_the_moon

photo of John Young by Charlie Duke

This work sucks, because I’m very lazy and have other things I’d rather do and preferred when my civic responsibility was minimal.

 

Counterpoint from Rabih Alameddine about whether we are better than this or not.  He tells a beautiful story at the end.