facepalm

the article that set me off was:

which caused my eyes to roll out of my head.  I was just in Portland, and the food was awesome!  It’s a “foodie paradise” because it’s in the Willamette Valley, on the Columbia River, near the North Pacific Ocean, one of the most bountiful regions on planet Earth, plus it’s prosperous and full of creative and interesting and diverse people.

Seemed hysterical to me to claim it had been ruined.

you’re telling me this place is ruined?

When I first heard the headline version of the story of the Portland Taco Cart Willamette Week Interview Fiasco, I thought “well that’s silly, how far are we taking this idea of cultural appropriation?  of course you can make tacos.”  But when I heard the details it was like oh ok that’s not very cool.

There was good discussion of it on “Good Food” with Evan Kleiman.

Following which I drove around for an hour or so doing my errands and thinking about it.  Sometime later it comes up, shot my Twitter mouth off and RIP my mentions.

Twitter user put my response to McArdle better than I could:

Also gave me more to think about.  I myself took advantage of the easygoing legal rules on map copying in my book, and used Google Maps as the basis for my hand-drawn maps.  It felt fine, although I was surprised nobody protects cartographers.

Because there’s no legal protection for Mexican ladies making burritos who are trying to keep their recipe secret, that’s why it made people so mad.  Kinda think Connelly and Wingus crossed the line, but whatever, maybe they just made an unfortunate remark in an interview.  They don’t deserve death threats for heaven’s sake.  Let’s wish them well and hope they make some cool new kind of burrito in the future that everyone can eat joyfully and without compunction.

Like Austin Kleon points out, there’s stealing and stealing.


Reviews of different milks (ongoing series)

2/5 udders.  Weak, watery milk.  Love the labeling, and “Forager Project” is powerful branding for these times.  But I taste no evidence that God intended for us to milk the cashew.   

A surprising 4/5 udders to filmjölk!  I despise yoghurt, from its name to its texture to its sour bite it repulses me, but a shot of siggi’s filmjölk in the morning has been invigorating and probably good for my guts.

Would love to find some chestnut milk, which Charles C. Mann describes as “ambrosial”!


Dictionary of National Biography

When you come across this book, it’s fun to take it down and open it at random and read about some guy.  For instance, Caleb Jeacocke, debater and roll-maker:


Insane?

Deluxe mac & cheese costs LESS than regular mac & cheese?

There must be a term in economics for where the fancier version is less desirable than the regular ol’ version and ends up less expensive.

I’ll pay more for minions, sure.


Carey

INTERVIEWER

How did you manage the historical setting?

CAREY

Well, I’m a bloody colonial, aren’t I? London is not my place and Britain is not my country. How was I going to have the authority to invent London in 1837? First I had to know something that’s different from what anybody ever thought about the period. I couldn’t steal from literature even if I wanted to—for the most part metropolitan literature takes the place for granted. So I spent a lot of time reading about people visiting London from abroad. They’re going to see things that would not occur to the Englishman. There was a German visitor to London, for instance, who spends all this time describing this weird English breakfast that turns out to be toast. That was terrific—the familiar defamiliarized. I was trying to imagine—what was it really like? We generally think of London in that period as gloomy and sooty and filthy, but in the New York Public Library I found an account by an American visitor who described London as ablaze with light. That’s not how anyone thinks of that period, but if you came from Australia or America at that time it was bright. I thought, that’s it—this story will start at night, and it will be blazing bright. That’s the first way in which I can colonize London for myself, take imaginative possession of the territory.

from the Paris Review interview with Peter Carey

 


Beyond Meat Bolognese

Used some Beyond Meat to make a bolognese.  I used more or less this recipe from attorney and new mom Michelle.

Shoutout to Filip H. for teaching me the secret to sauces is using this particular brand of crushed San Marzanos.

As you can see I still used 4 oz. of pancetta – baby steps, right?

Used one package of “beefy” flavor and one package of “fiesty” flavor Beyond Meat.

Gotta say it was pretty darn good.

Starting to become a believer in Beyond Meat.

 


Beyond Meat

Grilled some Beyond Meat burgers yesterday (over a combo of mesquite briquettes and mesquite chips).  As a noted burger enthusiast I declare this: pretty darn good.

File this under: Long June news you can use.