Leadership Shirt

Yeah, I’ll say!

That’s today’s Artwork Of The Day.

Going through my closet to determine which are my leadership shirts.


Doesn’t this look like Garry Shandling?

The Metropolitan Museum has five portraits that they’re pretty sure are by Hans Holbein The Younger.  Let’s have a look:

Here is Derick Berck of Cologne:

Here is Erasmus of Rotterdam:

Here is a member of the Wedigh family, probably Hermann von Wedigh:

“Truth breeds hatred,” is what that note in the book says, according to the Met, which “perhaps served as the sitter’s personal motto.”  Weird motto, bro.

And here is Man In A Red Cap:

Now.  Take a look at this one, of “Lady Lee”:

The Met says “The painting is close to the manner of Holbein, but the attention paid to decorative effects and linear details at the expense of life-like portrayal of the sitter is indicative of workshop production. The portrait was likely based on a Holbein drawing.”

(Are these guys for real?)


Blind, 1916, Paul Strand

That one’s not on display over at the Met.  Gotta find his photos of the Outer Hebrides online.


North Shore Homesick?

Sometimes my friends from the North Shore of Massachusetts who live in New York get homesick and call me up, desperate for a solution.  Always I tell them the same thing!  “Go to the 760 galleries on the second floor of the Met!”

There you can see Childe Hassam’s “The Church at Gloucester”:

Then you can see Winslow Homer’s “Eagle Head, Manchester, Massachusetts (High Tide):

Then you can see “Stage Fort Across Gloucester Harbor” by our boy FHL:

“Thanks Hely!” they say.


The Head of John The Baptist on a Charger

We here at The Hely Times are shameless about catering to our readers.  We’ve discovered that pictures depicting beheadings are among our most popular subjects.  So, today, a review of one of the great themes in Western Art, John the Baptist’s head on a charger.  NOTE: some other day we’ll do actual action-shot beheadings of John the Baptist. Today, we’re just dealing with the paintings that include the charger as well.

Caravaggio did it twice.  There’s the National Gallery, London:

And the Palacio Real, Madrid:

Met has a good one by Aelbert Bouts:

MFA has one by Bernardo Luini:

Lucas Cranach the Elder, now hanging in the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest:

That’s enough.


Last stop on the Hemingway/Lillian Ross tour of the Met

We came to El Greco’s green “View of Toledo” and stood looking at it a long time.  “This is the best picture in the Museum for me, and Christ knows there are some lovely ones,” Hemingway said.

After we reached the Cezannes and Degases and the other Impressionists, Hemingway became more and more excited, and discoursed on what each artist could do and how and what he had learned from each.  Patrick listened respectfully and didn’t seem to want to talk about painting techniques any more.  Hemingway spent several minutes looking at Cezanne’s “Rocks – Forest of Fontainebleu.”  “This is what we try to do in writing, this and this, and the woods, and the rocks we have to climb over,” he said.  “Cezanne is my painter, after the early painters.  Wonder, wonder painter…

As we walked along, Hemingway said to me, “I can make a landscape like Mr. Paul Cezanne.  I learned how to make a landscape from Mr. Paul Cezanne by walking through the Luxembourg Museum a thousand times with an empty gut, and I am pretty sure that if Mr. Paul was around, he would like the way I make them and be happy that I learned it from him.”

Wiki, close out Cezanne for us:

One day, Cézanne was caught in a storm while working in the field. Only after working for two hours under a downpour did he decide to go home; but on the way he collapsed. He was taken home by a passing driver. His old housekeeper rubbed his arms and legs to restore the circulation; as a result, he regained consciousness. On the following day, he intended to continue working, but later on he fainted; the model with whom he was working called for help; he was put to bed, and he never left it again. He died a few days later, on 22nd October 1906. He died of pneumonia and was buried at the old cemetery in his beloved hometown of Aix-en-Provence.


Captain George K. H. Coussmaker (Joshua Reynolds, 1782)

“What the hell!” Hemingway said suddenly. “I don’t want to be an art critic.  I just want to look at pictures and be happy with them and learn from them.  Now, this for me is a damn good picture.”  He stood back and peered at a Reynolds entitled “Colonel George Coussmaker,” which shows the Colonel leaning against a tree and holding his horse’s bridle.  “Now, this Colonel is a son of a bitch who was willing to pay money to the best portrait painter of his day just to have himself painted,” Hemingway said, and gave a short laugh.  “Look at the man’s arrogance and the strength in the neck of the horse and the way the man’s legs hang.  He’s so arrogant he can afford to lean against a tree.”

remembers Miss Ross.

Coussmaker sat for Reynolds 21 times and his horse 8 times between February 9 and April 16, 1782 – an exceptional number of times.