Los Angeles

Someone tagged this tree.


“In Shark’s life there had been no literary romance.”

In Shark’s life there had been no literary romance. At nineteen he took Katherine Mullock to three dances because she was available.  This started the machine of precedent and he married her because her family and all of the neighbors expected it.  Katherine was not pretty, but she had the firm freshness of a new weed, and the bridling vigor of a young mare.  After her marriage she lost her vigor and her freshness as a flower does once it has received pollen.  Her face sagged, her hips broadened, and she entered into her second destiny, that of work.

In his treatment of her, Shark was neither tender nor cruel.  He governed her with the same gentle inflexibility he used on horses.  Cruelty would have seemed to him as foolish as indulgence.  He never talked to her as to human, never spoke of his hopes or thoughts or failures, of his paper wealth nor of the peach crop.  Katherine would have been puzzled and worried if he had.  Her life was sufficiently complicated without the added burden of another’s thoughts and problems.


Pacific-Union Club Punch

This is the Pacific-Union Club, at the top of Nob Hill in San Francisco:

Are you going to tell me you can walk by that building and not think, “I want to make their famous punch!”

For a party of ten. Into a large punch-bowl place ten tablespoonfuls of bar sugar and ten tablespoonfuls of freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice. Add two jiggers of Curaçao and dissolve the whole in about a quart of effervescent water. Add two quarts of champagne and one bottle of good cognac. Stir thoroughly, ice, decorate and serve in thin glassware.

READER: be sure to use regular, orange Curacao, not blue curacao, or your punch will be a revolting green color.

That recipe is from William “Cocktail” Boothby’s 1908 book, The World’s Cocktails and How To Make Them.  Let’s take a look at Boothby’s resume, just to make sure he’s for real:

  • Minstrel performer.
  • Bartender in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and Kansas City.
  • Bartender at Byron Hot Springs.
  • Bartender (or in his terms “presiding deity”) at Hotel Rafael, San Rafael, California, in “the gay days when Baron von Schroeder was making history over there”.
  • Bartender at the Silver Palace, San Francisco
  • Bartender at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco.
  • Saloon owner.
  • Assemblyman in California in 1895. The 1908 edition of The World’s Drinks & How To Mix Them begins “To the liquor dealers of San Francisco who unanimously assisted in my election to the Legislature by an unprecedented majority.”
  • Soda drink counter supervisor, Olympic Club, during Prohibition
(from wikipedia)