Best photos I took in 2016

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Vancouver Island

img_8672Joshua Treeimg_9272Gaililee, RI
daf8272a-51e1-4083-b4c8-a509b10a5a54Death Valleyimg_5124Tofinoimg_5793Cambridge
img_7339-3Victoria
img_7126-1New Zealandimg_9451Two Harborsimg_3649Los Angeles

 


Thurgood’s take, and Yoichi Okamoto

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From Stephen L. Carter’s 2017 predictions, via Tyler Cowen.  (Helytimes is increasingly becoming a Tyler Cowen processing center).

Thurgood:

That photo is by Yoichi Okamoto:

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Looking a bit like Fredrik Wikingsson there, and here are more by Yoichi:

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found at this NYT slideshow of his work from 2013.


SUNDAY TAKE: The Economist

The Economist

Nearly Cloudless Scotland, As Seen From the ISS The International Space Station's Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams tweeted this photo recently with the caption "We had a great view of Scotland today…very rare to not be covered with clouds."

Nearly Cloudless Scotland, As Seen From the ISS
The International Space Station’s Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams tweeted this photo recently with the caption “We had a great view of Scotland today…very rare to not be covered with clouds.”

I’m tryna get that big picture view on things.  How does it all work?

What's going on in Bonn?

What’s going on in Bonn?

The search for answers led me to this magazine.

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What to make a magazine that has ads like this?

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Just a casual classified:

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As part of my ongoing effort to  become a guy who considers buying barge-mounted power plants, I became a subscriber.

The editor of The Economist is Zanny Minton Beddoes:

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Copyright by World Economic Forum swiss-image.ch/Photo Monika Flueckiger. This was taken at Davos, duh.

The Economist states its mission on the table of contents:

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Per Wikipedia:

It takes an editorial stance of classical and economic liberalism which is supportive of free trade, globalisation, free immigration and cultural liberalism (such as supporting legal recognition for same-sex marriage or drug liberalization).

To say it takes that stance is to put it mildly.  The Economist believes in free trade and globalisation the way other people believe in gravity.  For example, casual assumption what is “sensible” for Paraguay:

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Per Wikipedia again, linking to this 1999 Andrew Sullivan snark attack:

[Andrew Sullivan] also said that The Economist is editorially constrained because so many scribes graduated from the same college at Oxford University, Magdalen College. 

Not true!  Zanny Minton Beddoes was in  St. Hilda’s College at Oxford University!

Sullivan says:

as a weekly compost of world news and economics, it’s very hard to beat–a kind ofReader’s Digest for the overclass. It’s written in the kind of Oxbridge prose that trips felicitously into one ear and out the other, and it subtly flatters some Americans into feeling that they are sitting in on a combination of an English senior common room and a seminar at Davos. Besides, it’s hard to dislike a magazine that can run a photo of the pope meeting with Bill Clinton over the caption: “That’s 1,000 Hail Marys.”

That’s all true.  The subtle flattery is what I’m paying for.  Plus I love a good compost.

Sullivan has harsher criticisms, some of which still seem relevant seventeen years later.  I like his take that The Economist‘s no bylines policy is suspiciously socialist.  He’s criticizing The Economist for not being free markety enough!

More from Wiki’s “Criticism, accusation and praise“:

The Guardian wrote that “its writers rarely see a political or economic problem that cannot be solved by the trusted three-card trick of privatisation, deregulation and liberalisation”

To which The Economist might respond, “and where are we wrong?”

True to their hero, Adam Smith, The Economist hovers between brilliant and goofy.

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Here are some things I’ve learned from reading The Economist in the last three weeks:

  • “global internet traffic will surpass one zettabyte for the first time this year, the equivalent of 152m years of high-definition video”
  • Under Emperor Augustus, military wages and pensions absorbed half of all Rome’s tax revenues.
  • Norway’s sovereign wealth fund owns more than 2% of all listed shares in Europe and over 1% globally.  Its largest holdings are in Alphabet, Apple, Microsoft and Nestlé.  The fund is worth $882 billion.
  • The United Arab Emirates recently started a Ministry of Happiness
  • There’s so much cannabis grown in Albania that in 2014 it might’ve had a value equal to half of the country’s GDP
  • bluefin tuna are down 97% from their peak in the early 1960s
  • Japanese people are obsessed with Portland

How about this take:  reporting on the Russian elections, where only 48% of people bothered to vote on the selected candidates they were allowed to, here’s how The Economist sees the problem:

Mr Putin’s latest victory turns the Duma into more of a sham.  As a result, he risks becoming detached.  In the view of Gleb Pavlovsky, a political analyst and former adviser to Mr Putin, Russia’s leaders are like pilots flying in heavy turbulence with the cockpit dials all painted over.

What a take!  Like: democracy is meaningful mainly as a source of information for dictatorial technomanagers!

Wonder if I would’ve been smarter if instead of classes in college I read this magazine cover to cover every week, as Bill Gates says he does.

jess


Hamatsa emerging from the woods – Koskimo

Curtis photo

good photo from the Edward S. Curtis archives / Library of Congress.

Princess Angeline

Princess Angeline (Duwamish)


Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man

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found by the Bookbinder.


Moon

Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.53.47 PMWent through NASA’s new Flickr of the Apollo missions looking for good ones I hadn’t seen before.  Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.53.58 PM

Some very great shades of blue.
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Camping!

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Mexico!

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Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.46.36 PMEarf

Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.53.13 PMNASA’s foil game is so on pointScreen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.56.53 PMGoodbye spaceman!Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.57.16 PM  Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.56.45 PM

Making movies
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Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.57.34 PMWish traffic in LA were like this. Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 1.57.25 PM

 


The Duke of Abruzzi

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This one prompted me to pick up a book I’d been hearing about for awhile.  Wade Davis has been featured on Helytimes before.

Wade DavisHe is the real deal.

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The opening chapter of this book is intense, vivid writing about the British experience on the Western Front during World War I.  Thought I’d read enough about that horror show: Robert Graves and Paul Fussell and Geoff Dyer.  Maybe the guy who hit me in the guts the hardest was Siegfried Sassoon, in part because of what a groovy idyllic life got catastrophically ruined for him.

But Wade Davis makes it all new again.  One paragraph will do:

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Also fascinating:

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Click here if you want to see a photo of Mallory’s dead body, discovered in 1999, seventy five years after he was lost on Everest. Only halfway through Davis’ book, at the moment I’m deep in Tibet suffering along on the painstaking surveying expeditions.

A character keeps popping like a fox into the story and then disappearing — a rival mountaineer, the Duke Of Abruzzi.

Duke of Abruzzi

(You can read about Abruzzi, why I’d be interested in a duke from there here.)  What a life.  Says Wiki:

He had begun to train as a mountaineer in 1892 on Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa (Italian Alps): in 1897 he made the first ascent of Mount Saint Elias (Canada/U.S., 5,489 m). There the expedition searched for a mirage, known as the Silent City of Alaska, that natives and prospectors claimed to see over a glacier. C. W. Thornton, a member of the expedition, wrote: “It required no effort of the imagination to liken it to a city, but was so distinct that it required, instead, faith to believe that it was not in reality a city.”[citation needed]

Another witness wrote in The New York Times: “We could plainly see houses, well-defined streets, and trees. Here and there rose tall spires over huge buildings which appeared to be ancient mosques or cathedrals.”

If you’re climbing K2 you’re liable to be on the Abruzzi Spur:

Late in life:

In 1918, the Duke returned to Italian Somaliland. In 1920, he founded the “Village of the Duke of Abruzzi” (Villaggio Duca degli Abruzzi orVillabruzzi) some ninety kilometres north of Mogadishu. It was an agricultural settlement experimenting with new cultivation techniques. By 1926, the colony comprised 16 villages, with 3,000 Somali and 200 Italian (Italian Somalis) inhabitants. Abruzzi raised funds for a number of development projects in the town, including roads, dams, schools, hospitals, a church and a mosque. He died in the village on 18 March 1933. After Italian Somaliland was dissolved, the town was later renamed to Jowhar.

Jowhar

Jowhar found here, I hope user Talya doesn’t mind: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1569979.  From wiki: “On May 17, 2009, the Islamist al-Shabab militia took of the town, and imposed draconian rules, including a ban on handshaking between men and women.”

Let’s skip to the best part of any Wikipedia page, “Personal Life:”

In the early years of the twentieth century the Abruzzi was in a relationship with Katherine Hallie “Kitty” Elkins, daughter of the wealthy American senator Stephen Benton Elkins, but the Abruzzi’s cousin King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy refused to grant him permission to marry a commoner. His brother, Emanuele Filiberto, to whom Luigi was very close, convinced him to give up the relationship.[8] His brother later approved of young Antoinette “Amber” Brizzi, the daughter of Quinto Brizzi, one of the largest vineyard owners in northern Italy. In the later years of his life, Abruzzi married a young Somali woman named Faduma Ali.

Here is a picture of the Duke of Abruzzi:

Duke Of Abruzzo

That was taken by Vittorio Sella.

The high quality of Sella’s photography was in part due to his use of 30×40 cm photographic plates, in spite of the difficulty of carrying bulky and fragile equipment into remote places. He had to invent equipment, including modified pack saddles and rucksacks, to allow these particularly large glass plates to be transported safely.[6] His photographs were widely published and exhibited, and highly praised; Ansel Adams, who saw thirty-one that Sella had presented to the US Sierra Club, said they inspired “a definitely religious awe”.

Siniolchu_by_SellaMore on the Duke by Peter Bridges at VQR 

Hey again I just yank photos and stuff from books from all over — not sure if that’s like an ok practice but this is a non-profit site, try to credit everyone, the whole point is that maybe you will want to go look at/read the originals.